enrollment

Susan Stephens

Northern Illinois University recently announced it will no longer require the ACT and SAT for admission and scholarships.

Arturo Chuatz is an accounting major from Elgin. He says the announcement doesn’t matter much to him since he is close to graduating. But he says it could help his family. He says his little sister sometimes struggles on standardized tests.

“She gets super anxious and she’s always like, ‘I don’t do well on exams.’ It’s going to help her out if she chooses to transfer to a four-year university eventually,” Chuatz said.

Susan Stephens

Northern Illinois University is working to increase its overall enrollment and provide more aid to disadvantaged groups.

University officials testified this week in front of the Illinois House Appropriations Higher Education Committee.  Provost Beth Ingram said the school’s goal is to stabilize NIU enrollment at 17 to 18,000 students, as part of a multiyear campus plan. She also said there’s been more diverse hiring over the past year.

“I’m pleased to report," she said, "that of the 30 new tenure-track faculty we hired, 50%, 15, were from underrepresented groups." 

Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

An advocacy group is calling on Illinois to make higher education more equitable for students.  It says that means changing the way it funds post-secondary schooling.

Before they dug into the numbers, Kyle Westbrook said his group wanted to try to reframe the conversation around the cost of college in Illinois.

Logo design by Spencer Tritt

Rich Egger, news director at Tri States Public Radio in Macomb, joins us for a special edition episode of Teachers’ Lounge. Public radio stations across the state collaborated on our “Enrollment Exodus” series chronicling enrollment challenges facing Illinois colleges and universities, especially since the 2015-2017 state budget impasse.

NIU Taking A Long View When It Comes To Enrollment

Sep 12, 2019
Shaylee Hester

Overall enrollment at Northern Illinois University fell to 16,609. That’s the lowest it has been in 50 years. 

But, university officials say that’s not cause for too much concern. They say they saw it coming, and are encouraged by new student numbers, which increased year-to-year.

Sol Jensen says they’re also happy about other growth in other indicators. He’s the vice president for enrollment management, marketing and communication.

Logo design by Spencer Tritt

A mother and daughter, they both teach kindergarten at the same school. They come from a long line of teachers in their family. And this year, the next generation is putting on her backpack to share those same halls as she goes into kindergarten herself.

Photo by Spencer Tritt

A few days a week, Earlville high school juniors and seniors sit down for their first class in what's called their "college classroom." It's where they can take dual enrollment courses, and get college credit if they pass.

Last year, Earlville's graduating class was only 37 students. But they left with nearly a combined 200 college credit hours.

"Because we are a textbook, low-income, small country school, we're kind of proud of all the different opportunities that we can offer the kids," said principal Jeanette Fruit.

Susan Stephens

Northern Illinois University has a new enrollment plan that aims to have 18,000 students by fall 2023.

 

The DeKalb Daily Chronicle reports NIU President Lisa Freeman wants to stem years of enrollment decline. Enrollment peaked during the 2007-2008 school year at 25,000 students but since then enrollment has declined 30 percent to about 17,100 students.

Farm fields abound around Indian Creek High School. But step into a classroom, and you're a far cry from the rural stereotype.
 

The kids are looking down at laptops, glancing back up to check the flat-screen monitors mounted to the walls displaying the Quizlet program they're using to study.

The only thing that isn't updated is the bell. "It's actually a real bell," jokes Principal Sarah Montgomery. "It's not digital."
 

It’s been a rough couple of years for Illinois community colleges, from the slashed funds of the budget impasse to concerning enrollment declines. We begin a three-part series on how these very different schools have stayed afloat by embracing change and, more importantly, putting the "community" in community college.

 

It’s been a rough couple of years for Illinois community colleges, from the slashed funds of the budget impasse to concerning enrollment declines. This is part two in a three-part series on how these very different schools have stayed afloat by embracing change and, more importantly, putting the community in community college.

 

wiu.edu

Western Illinois University’s short-term goal is to stabilize enrollment at 10,000 students, but it came up a bit short this fall.

Western says its current enrollment is 9,441, which is a drop of nine percent from last fall and nearly 15 percent from two years ago.

Jessie Schlacks / WNIJ

Enrollment at many Illinois public universities has declined in the past decade. This coincides with the state approaching two years without a full spending plan. As a result, college-bound students have tough decisions to make.

"old gym locker room" by Flickr user Charles Kremenak / (CC X 2.0)

Student enrollment has been trending down at Western Illinois University for much of the last decade. For the first time this century, there are fewer than 10,000 students enrolled at Western.

Dr. Ron Williams is the interim vice president for student services at Western. He says there about 629 fewer students this semester compared to last spring. 

He says that’s a loss of about 6.5 percent.

University of Illinois officials unveiled an enrollment plan Thursday at a Board of Trustees meeting in Chicago, with protestors calling for protection of undocumented students.  

Trustees want to boost system-wide enrollment to more than 90,000 students by 2021.  President Tim Killeen told them that, as of 2014, nearly half of high school graduates attended college outside the state.  He says they’re less likely to return home to start a career and family.

Flickr user / alamosbasement "old school" (CC BY 2.0)

A preliminary report on college enrollment in Illinois shows a decline at all sectors of higher education.

All three categories -- public universities, community colleges and private colleges — showed an overall drop in enrollment, according to a report from the Illinois Board of Higher Education.

Illinois State University and the three University of Illinois campuses showed slight increases; all other public schools declined by an average of almost 3 percent compared to last year.   

The Illinois Campaign for Political Reform recently compared enrollment data of Illinois public colleges and universities against similar schools in six neighboring states. 

Enrollment at the state's three largest public universities increased -- but just barely. The biggest gain was at the University of Illinois flagship campus in Urbana-Champaign, at 1.8%.  

csu.edu

Freshman enrollment at financially troubled Chicago State University has fallen to 86 freshmen this fall semester.

Figures released Tuesday show the university on Chicago's South Side has fewer than half the students it did six years ago. The Chicago Tribune reports that about 3,600 students are taking classes this fall, down from about 7,350 students in 2010.

Overall enrollment is down 25 percent, and undergraduate enrollment is down 32 percent in one year.

It's a mixed bag of news about enrollment from state schools in Illinois this week.

Northern Illinois University President Doug Baker says enrollment is down 5.5%, putting the school at 19,015 students university-wide. Baker tells the campus community that the largest decline is in the freshman class. Numbers from NIU show there are 457 fewer freshman compared to last year; that's a drop of 20.2%. Smaller declines took place among transfer and graduate students. 

Rockford University

Rockford University reached its highest enrollment in twenty years. The number of full-time undergraduate students is up nearly nine percent over the last year.

Vice President for Enrollment Management Eric Fulcomer says the school's Rock Solid marketing campaign is resonating with diverse audiences.