ICE Agrees To Rescind Policy Barring Foreign Students From Online Study In The U.S.

Updated at 6:34 p.m. ET In a swift reversal, the Trump administration has agreed to rescind a directive that would have barred international college students from the U.S. if their colleges offered classes entirely online in the fall semester. The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement rule change , released last week, would have prohibited foreign students from entering or remaining in the country to take fully online course loads. A number of colleges and universities had already...

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Rockford University Unveils New Scholarship For Black Students

4 hours ago
Juanpablo Ramirez-Franco

 

 

Rockford University announced a new scholarship this week aimed at Black students interested in pursuing business.

 

Between Rockford University and the Puri Foundation, twelve Black students per year will be able to pursue a business degree and graduate in five years with zero debt. That’s thanks to a new scholarship, named after Rockford’s first Black mayor, Charles Box.

 

To Change Or Not To Change - 'That Is The Question'

6 hours ago
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An Illinois coalition that advocates changing the state from a flat to a progressive income tax is highlighting public support for an amendment on the November ballot that would do just that.

July 15th is the deadline for filing this year’s income taxes. The Vote Yes for Fair Tax group is using this week to remind people of the upcoming Fair Tax amendment.  This includes voters from Rockford, DeKalb, Peoria, Springfield, Chicago and Metro East.

Perspective: Summer Stream Of Consciousness

20 hours ago
oil painting
Angela Wilson / angelarosewilson.com

Having recently read To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf, I invite you to escape for the next minute or so and come along on this wee wander down a summer stream of consciousness.

Guy Stephens

As Illinois slowly reopens, live music is also trying to make a comeback -- at least in a few places.

With large-scale gatherings still a no-no in Illinois, big shows and music festivals have mostly been canceled or postponed. But some smaller locations are taking tentative steps beyond virtual or small outdoor offerings. 

https://www.gorockford.com/things-to-do/public-art/

Lots of art is exhibited in downtown Rockford. But most times, there is a cost associated with this. Donor support is allowing the continuation of a certain public display.

The Rockford Sculpture Walk is normally presented for two years.  

Kristen Paul is the director of destination development for the Rockford Area Convention and Visitors Bureau.

She said the 13 sculptures were due to come down in June but the pandemic spoiled that plan.

Connie Kuntz

An Illinois bird tested positive for West Nile virus, but no humans have been diagnosed with the virus this  year.

Ryan Kerch is the environmental health supervisor with the Winnebago County Health Department. He says they don't want to scare anybody, but it's important to understand that the virus is always out there.

"West Nile is present," he said. "It is active and it has been throughout the state for a number of years. It is a statewide concern."

Perspective: Make Common Courtesy Common

Jul 13, 2020
Susan Stephens / WNIJ

Holding the door open for someone approaching the door. Saying please, thank you, and excuse me. Pulling all the way up at school drop off. Wearing a mask. These are all examples of common courtesy.

I have lived in big cities, suburbs and here in DeKalb County for over a decade. And sadly, common courtesy is not something I see as often as I would hope.

On this week's episode, we examine the economic blow of students leaving college towns and the health risks associated with their planned return.  

Photo provided by George Buss

Creativity is not taking a back seat to COVID-19. Some performances are happening with the use of the technology. An Illinois history group is joining in on the fun.

The Looking for Lincoln Heritage Coalition will virtually host: “Lincoln, The Great Communicator.”

Sarah Watson is the executive director of Looking for Lincoln and the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area. She said seven shows will take place live. Partner communities will host them on their Facebook pages.

The University of Illinois Springfield released its fall plan with details on how students and faculty would return to the campus and remain safe during the coronavirus pandemic. 

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News From NPR

Pamela Talkin had been at the Supreme Court in the top security job for less than two months when 9/11 hit. Her first task that morning was to evacuate the building, but Chief Justice William Rehnquist didn't know a terrorist attack was in progress, and he was presiding over an important meeting with chief judges from around the country. When a note Talkin sent in got no response, she walked into the room and ordered everyone out of the building, fast.

Over the last three months, Delta Air Lines lost nearly $6 billion as the company's CEO said a slow, brief recovery in air travel has now stalled amid a big resurgence in coronavirus infections.

Delta is the first U.S. airline to report second-quarter financial results; it is the first full quarter since the pandemic began, and the results are worse than anticipated.

Updated at 7:57 p.m. ET

To help figure out the U.S. citizenship status of every adult living in the country, the Trump administration has been accumulating driver's license information from states including South Dakota, NPR has learned.

Relations between the more than 25,000 U.S. military forces on Okinawa and that Japanese island's 1.5 million residents have long been strained over pollution, crime and overcrowding associated with the 31 U.S. military bases there. Now a new outbreak of COVID-19 cases among American service members stationed on Japan's southernmost territory is fraying things further.

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

President Trump dismissed outrage over police killings, saying Tuesday that "more white people" are killed by police than Blacks.

"So are white people!" Trump said when asked in an interview with CBS News about why so many African Americans have been killed at the hands of police. "So are white people! What a terrible question to ask."

Trump added that "more white people, by the way" are killed by police than Black people.

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