ComEd

Kishwaukee Water Reclamation District

Hopkins and Rotary Park in DeKalb will soon have some of their turf grass replaced with native plants for local pollinators.

The Kishwaukee Water Reclamation District is working with the DeKalb Park District to convert nearly 23 acres of land.  Through the fall, they’ll clear the existing grass and vegetation, then plant native seeds in November. Amy Doll with the Park District said that will leave the land somewhat barren for a brief period. 

Illinois Utilities Extend Shutoff Moratorium

Sep 4, 2020
Pixabay

Some Illinois utilities have agreed to extend their moratorium on disconnections.

 

This announcement comes from the Illinois Commerce Commission.

 

The COVID utility relief agreement will also provide additional consumer protections and deferred payment agreements. 

 

After Republican Petition, Special Committee Will Investigate Madigan’s ComEd Ties

Sep 2, 2020
Capitol News Illinois

A special House committee will look into House Speaker Michael Madigan’s ties to Commonwealth Edison and determine whether discipline is needed after House Republican leadership filed a petition to initiate the process.

The committee was formed Wednesday pursuant to Illinois House rules after House Republican Leader Jim Durkin, of Western Springs, filed the nine-page petition Monday.

senatordavesyverson.com

Republican State Senator Dave Syverson is co-sponsoring a resolution that encourages the Illinois Congressional Delegation to direct a ComEd federal fine back to the state.

ComEd has to pay $200 million to settle allegations it engaged in long-term bribery in Springfield. Syverson said normally the money would go directly to the federal government.

“There are some allowances that can be made which either Congress or the U.S. Attorney General could step in and direct those payments back to those who were damaged, in this case the ratepayers.”

Flickr user E Photos / "IMG_1927 - Power Lines" (CC v 2.0)

The pandemic and accompanying stay-at-home orders have greatly affected many regional services, including utilities.

Governor J.B. Pritzker’s stay-at-home order and the accompanying months of social distancing have greatly affected what buildings remain open, and where people spend their time. 

Modern life requires electricity, and more people at home has changed how it’s consumed.  Aleksi Paaso is the Director of Distribution Planning at ComEd.  He said the times of day in which people use the most electricity haven’t shifted, but the system’s still been affected.

Temperatures dropped dramatically Tuesday night and dangerously cold conditions will continue through Wednesday. Northern Illinois utility giant ComEd has a weather command center up and running. It's meant to be able to take a larger volume of calls, especially from residents without power. 

Jenna Dooley

Utility rate payers, not taxpayers, will help cover the cost to build a new library in downtown Rockford.

A gas plant operated at the current site of Rockford’s main library in the 1800s. Due to a series of mergers over the years, it's now the responsibility of utility company ComEd to clean up contaminated soil underneath the building.

Exelon Generation

Illinois lawmakers are considering whether to approve an energy deal on behalf of Exelon. Without it, the power company says it will close nuclear plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities.

Exelon says there are about 1,500 workers between the two plants, plus thousands of other local jobs that would be affected. Vice President David Fine says the average ComEd residential customer would see her bill go up by less than 25 cents a month over the 10 years of the deal. "And in the first couple years," Fine says, "we anticipate there'll actually be a savings — a rate decrease."

Wikimedia Commons

Gov. Bruce Rauner says he wants to protect all the jobs he can at Exelon nuclear plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities.  They're slated to close unless they get help from the state.

energy.gov

A deal may keep Exelon’s Clinton and Quad Cities nuclear plants open for the foreseeable future. The company says it will shut down the plants unless lawmakers pass a bill allowing it to raise electricity rates.  

Fidel Marquez, an executive with Exelon subsidiary ComEd, believes the rate hike will save jobs and keep energy rates competitive.

"It's pretty Basic micro economics, that when you reduce the supply a significant amount, energy prices in the state will rise," he said.  

Wikimedia Commons

Illinois lawmakers introduced an electricity rate increase meant to save two western Illinois nuclear power plants, and their associated jobs.  However, the measure is facing significant opposition.

Exelon, ComEd's parent company, says it's losing money on nuclear power plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities.  Critics say the measure is a bailout -- and the largest rate increase in Illinois history.   Lobbyist Dave Lundy urged lawmakers to reject the plan.

 

Flickr User James Bowe / "Lightbulb" (CC BY 2.0)

The leader of Illinois' largest utility is appealing to lawmakers’ competitive spirits to get them on board with overhauling energy regulations.

ComEd CEO Ann Pramaggiore says many Fortune 500 companies have committed to meeting sustainable energy goals.

"No one has claimed this leadership mantle. New York is in the race. The big California cities are contenders as well. And while they have more technology than New York, their markets are no more robust. Clean energy leadership is Chicago’s for the taking,” Pramaggiore said.

Flickr User James Bowe / "Lightbulb" (CC BY 2.0)

ComEd is working to change how it bills for electricity use. 

They want to charge customers based on how much energy they use when demand is high, rather than what they use overall.  A group of Chicago politicians signed on to a letter with various groups opposing the plan.  This includes the Illinois Public Interest Research Group.  PIRG President Abe Scarr says it confuses customers.

 Homefield Energy will offer around $87,000 in refunds to  5,900 customers who were overbilled.  

 

 

The Daily Chronicle reports an aggregation contract approved by the city council was supposed to lower rates by 12.9%. beginning in July.  However, the company didn’t enter the change into their system.  As a result, affected residents were billed at the old rate of 7.237 cents per kilowatt hour in July and August, rather than 6.307 cents per kilowatt hour.    

Power Outages Reported Across Northern Illinois

Jul 6, 2016

Various news outlets are reporting power outages across the state as a result of the recent severe weather.

Ameren Illinois says 1000 customers are without power in Ottawa, 29 around Marseilles, and several people in McNabb. 

-ComEd reports 45 different outages in Rockford, with 2,508 customers affected.  These include the Museum Center and Meals on Wheels, whose services have been delayed in Winnebago and Boone Counties.  Rockford's Human Services offices are also without power.  The Rockford Municipal Employees Credit Union is closed today because of the power outage.

Lower ComEd rates have some Sterling residents wondering if they should go off the city’s aggregation plan

Sterling made a three-year deal with MidAmerican Energy in 2014.  At the time, their rates were lower than other companies.  

Saukvalley.com reports, however, that this year, ComEd’s rates of 6.3cents per kilowatt/hour is more attractive than MidAmerican’s 7.6 cents to some residents.  

Flickr User James Bowe / "Lightbulb" (CC BY 2.0)

A Chicago-area utility is warning customers about scam artists posing as employees.

Commonwealth Edison said yesterday it has seen an increase in scam reports.

The utility says con artists have been contacting small businesses and other customers by phone and in person. They claim to be ComEd representatives seeking payment.

Sometimes the impostors claim a customer's billing cycle has changed and an immediate payment is required. They have instructed people to buy a prepaid credit card and to call back with a personal identification number.

Flickr User James Bowe / "Lightbulb" (CC BY 2.0)

The Illinois Commerce Commission has approved a rate decrease for ComEd and rates increase for Ameren Illinois.

ComEd says the lowered delivery rate announced Wednesday is the result of efficiencies generated from the continuing rollout of its smart grid. The rate decrease is expected to mean the average residential customer should pay about $1 a month less on their bill, starting next month.

The commission approved a $67 million rate decrease -- $17 million more than the $50 million decrease ComEd proposed.

Flickr user E Photos / "IMG_1927 - Power Lines" (CC v 2.0)

Commonwealth Edison's CEO says the state's largest utility is about halfway through with a major component of a grid modernization program.

A controversial law passed in 2011 hiked the price for the delivery of electricity. Ameren and ComEd were to use the money for infrastructure upgrades, like the installation of so-called "smart meters."

Smart meters are digital devices that measure electricity use, and send that information back to the utilities.

ComEd / Wikipedia

Grants from a utility company will help communities in northern Illinois improve safety.

Concerned about storms that have ripped through the area, the City of Harvard will use its grant to replace outdated warning sirens.

The Village of Kingston will acquire a speed detector to enhance safety on the state highway that runs through town and the local grade-school zone. Two other recipients will get automated external defibrillators, also known as AEDs.

ComEd is inviting seniors citizens in Rockford to apply for the “Senior Giving” hardship fund program. 

It’s part of the utility’s CARE program, which offers financial aid options for customers with past due electric bills. The program is available through December 24th, or while funds are available. 

Customers can apply at the office of Community Action on Court Street.  

FutureGen

The Illinois Supreme Court agreed to hear a case regarding the FutureGen clean-coal project in central Illinois.

The high court said it would consider whether state utilities must buy electricity from the Morgan County facility. A 2012 ruling required companies like ComEd to sign 20-year contracts for FutureGen-produced power.

Flickr user E Photos / "IMG_1927 - Power Lines" (CC v 2.0)

The Illinois Commerce Commission approved ComEd’s Grand Prairie Gateway Project, a new transmission line that will run across DeKalb, Ogle, Kane and DuPage counties.

Construction is set to begin after April 2015 for the line to be in service by June 2017. The line will require about 400 steel power poles from ComEd’s existing substation just east of the Kane County line to the substation in Byron.

Decision Nearing On Proposed Transmission Line

Sep 29, 2014

State regulators will soon decide on an energy project for northern Illinois.

ComEd

Several thousand residents in Stephenson and Jo Daviess Counties remain without power after severe storms that blew through the region overnight late Monday and early Tuesday. 

ComEd Gets Feedback On Transmission Line

Oct 14, 2013
Mike Moen/WNIJ

ComEd is almost done gathering public input for a proposed transmission line in northern Illinois. The next step is getting approval from state regulators. Ahead of that decision, residents in one community hope the Illinois Commerce Commission endorses a route that doesn't affect their properties.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

Northern Illinois needs a faster, more reliable electrical grid. That’s why Com Ed is being advised to build a 57-mile-long high-power transmission line stretching across four counties. The company that supplies electricity to most of the region is holding open houses about the project it’s calling “The Grand Prairie Gateway.”

Quinn Vetoes Smart Grid Bill

May 6, 2013

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn vetoed legislation yesterday that would have paved the way for increases in electric rates. The bill applies to the state's largest electric utilities: ComEd and Ameren. They're trying to secure a rate hike in order to pay for upgrades to their smart grid. Normally, the utilities have to go through a state regulator, but that agency said "no" to rate hikes. So the companies have been trying a different strategy.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

The DeKalb Nature Trail was replanted Thursday, half a year after ComEd removed most of the growth below its overhead transmission lines.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

Planting will begin soon along a DeKalb nature trail that was clear-cut below Com Ed power lines last November. The group tasked with coming up with a restoration plan presented it to the public last night. 

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