Perspective: Lies

Sep 3, 2020


Kellyanne Conway is leaving her job at the White House. She says she wants to spend more time with her teenage children and husband.


   

She’ll be remembered for her confrontational manner -- and for her lies. She burst out of the gate on January 22, 2017, with the jaw-dropping phrase “alternative facts,” the term she used to defend press secretary Spicer’s lie about the size of the crowd at Trump’s inauguration. Lying became a way of life in this White House.

 

Contrast the two recent political conventions. The Democrats’ was fairly traditional in one important way. The message was clear and unifying - come together to support Joe Biden, a compassionate person, a moderate Democrat, and a man with plans to solve the country’s many serious problems. No one needed to lie about or exaggerate these problems. The truth is bad enough.

 

The Republicans’ approach was very different. Trump and the people who spoke at the convention told lie after lie after lie. About testing, treatments, the non-existent Trump health care plan, the economy, China, crime -- but most of all, about Biden.

 

Because Trump cannot run against the real Joe Biden, a moderate with a long history of compromise. He must conjure up a fictional, frightening opponent. Trump knows he’s made a mess of the pandemic and the economy and he has no intention of providing leadership to calm the social unrest. His only path to victory is to lie and say he can make America great again again.

 

I’m Deborah Booth and that’s my perspective.