NCAA

NIU Athletics

College athletes are returning to campuses across the country.

Voluntary workouts are underway for football and basketball players at Northern Illinois University.  And the NCAA has approved plans to begin official preseason practices later this summer.

A proposal that would let college athletes make money from endorsements cleared a major hurdle Wednesday in the Illinois General Assembly.

Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker is supporting legislation that would let college athletes get paid for endorsements.

Last week, when California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a law allowing college athletes to get endorsement deals, he set off a wave of copycat legislation proposed in at least a dozen more states, including Illinois. 

State Representative Emanuel Chris Welch (D-Hillside) filed a bill here to make sure Illinois keeps up. 

"If I'm a coach in California right now, this is an amazing recruiting tool, and I think it places them at an advantage in the recruiting arena. And so I'd like to make sure colleges and universities in Illinois have the same tool that California universities do,” Welch says.

NCAA

Federal prosecutors indicted four NCAA men’s basketball assistant coaches on charges of fraud and corruption. 

One of them, Lamont Evans, worked under current University of Illinois head coach Brad Underwood when Underwood was the head coach at Oklahoma State University.

The other three assistant coaches charged are Chuck Person of Auburn, Emanuel Richardson of the University of Arizona, and Tony Bland of the University of Southern California.

Prosecutors also indicted James Gatto, the Director of Global Marketing for Adidas.

NCAA

A federal appellate panel has upheld a lower court ruling that the NCAA needs to provide full scholarships for student athletes, including meals and cellphone expenses.  But the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals panel struck down another ruling requiring schools to pay athletes up to $5,000 annually for the use of their name, likeness or image.

University of Illinois Labor and Employment Relations Professor Michael LeRoy calls this part of the decision a “significant victory” for the NCAA.