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Kishwaukee College President Receives Contract Extension & Raises

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Susan Stephens
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The Kishwaukee College Board voted to extend its president’s contract through 2024. It gives Laurie Borowicz a $10,000 base salary increase to $200,000 per year. The college also upped her employer contribution retirement match from 1-1 to 2-1.

Bob Johnson is the president of the Kishwaukee College Board of Trustees. He said she deserved the upgrades.

“We've made significant improvement under her leadership in retention and student success,” he said.

Retention indicators show modest improvement since Borowicz started in 2015. Johnson specifically said the board was proud of her work with local high schools establishing dual-credit opportunities and career and technical pathways. He also praised her work helping the college maneuver this year.

“Particularly through this pandemic thing, when we had to switch our, our education model from a little bit online to almost everything online. And we were, we were very pleased with her performance.”

The community college is in a precarious position. Data from 2019 shows graduation rates are up over Borowicz’ time as president. But enrollment continues to drop precipitously, and pandemic concerns caused a 14% decrease this fall.

During her time as president, some Kish faculty have expressed dissatisfaction with her leadership of the college.

Johnson said the college is in a good financial position thanks for state contributions and CARES Act funding, despite the enrollment dip.

He says COVID-related federal funds helped them purchase, among other equipment, biology lab kits for students to take home.

Borowicz’ previous contract was not set to expire for another two years.