Election 2020

You're the boss at the ballot box this year. In 2020, we are covering elections a little differently, and it puts you in the driver's seat.

In previous election cycles, our reporters have gone to local and regional candidates to ask questions about how they plan to serve in public office. This year, we want voters leading these conversations.

In collaboration with Illinois Newspapers of the USA Today Network, WNIJ is co-hosting several listening sessions in order to hear directly from voters about what issues are most important to them and specific questions they have for the candidates running to represent their communities. Then, we will ask those questions to the candidates.

We will share those responses here and on-air between now and November.

We also want to hear from you! Look for voter questions in coming weeks at wnij.org.

Additional support for "You're the Boss" comes from a grant from the Solutions Journalism Network.

Campaigning During COVID-19

Apr 3, 2020
Pixabay

In light of the statewide shelter-in-place order and the new guidelines on social distancing from the White House, a number of Illinois 2020 congressional campaigns have changed their methods for connecting and reaching out to the public.

Jim Oberweis, the Republican challenger in Illinois’ 14th district described the massive change the pandemic brought to his campaign.

Chase Cavanaugh

As the Illinois primary election draws closer, college students are preparing to cast their votes. Some for the first time. As part of our series, "You're the Boss," we asked several NIU voters at campus voter registration events about their most important issues in the election, and what questions they would ask candidates and current officeholders directly if they had the chance.  Here's what they had to say:

Salvador Meza, electrical and computer engineering major, Chicago

Chase Cavanaugh

Kishwaukee College in Malta has many students who have or will reach voting age.  But education instructor Cynthia de Seife said some of these students had misconceptions.

“A while back, I was doing voter registration here at the college and some students were saying how they don’t vote, they don’t ever vote, their vote doesn’t count," she said. " And I thought, 'No. This is a college. No no no. This is not okay. We can do better than that.'”