fraud

Pixabay

Scammers are taking advantage of the pandemic to trick people into giving away money and personal information.

Some of these scams take the forms of e-mails and robocalls claiming to be from a reputable organization like the CDC or WHO. There can be an appeal to urgency, such as saying you were exposed by someone to the disease, and they need your personal information. Others may be asking for donations, but those aren’t actually going to a legitimate organization. Retired NIU Professor David  Sinason specializes in fraud prevention. He said due diligence is key.

DeKalb Police Department

Bogus money is circulating around DeKalb.

The currency says “MOTION PICTURE USE ONLY” where the words “THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” should be, according to police officials.

DeKalb police officials say about six incidents were reported within the last week or so about the bills – which do not have watermarks, color-shifting ink or a security thread – being used as legitimate money.

DeKalb Police Commander Steve Lekkas says authorities are collecting video surveillance of the offenders.

AARON SCHOCK / INSTAGRAM

Former U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock is due to be arraigned in a Springfield courtroom this afternoon.  

The 35-year-old Republican is charged with scheming to defraud the government, campaign donors, and constituents. Federal prosecutors say it adds up to thousands upon thousands of dollars for everything from cars and cameras to vacations and Super Bowl tickets.

Shock resigned last year. He’s said any mistakes made in Congress were administrative errors.

Wikimedia Commons

Certain political candidates are encouraging their supporters to keep an eye out for possible voting fraud on Election Day. 

Jim Tenuto is with the State Board of Elections.  He says poll watchers come in early to see how things are set up. They observe throughout the day and stick around to keep an eye on the vote-counting process. Tenuto says poll watchers can raise a red flag if they think somebody is trying to commit fraud.

 

25 Illinois Residents Face Charges For Health Care Fraud

Jun 19, 2015
Medicare.gov

Doctors, nurses and a Medicaid recipient are among 25 Illinois residents facing federal criminal charges in a nationwide health-care fraud sweep. 

Federal authorities say the questionable Medicare and Medicaid billings totaled more than $700 million. 

U.S. Attorney Stephen Wiggington says this crime hurts people with disabilities who don't receive the care for which the provider is billing, as well as those who don't get the care they need because there's not enough money left in the system. 

Horses for sale, curious entries in Crundwell case

Jun 15, 2012

UPDATE: (6/16/12) 

A federal judge has granted permission to the U.S. Marshals Service to begin selling 401 quarter horses owned by former Dixon Comptroller Rita A. Crundwell.

Federal marshals wanted permission to sell some or all of the more than 400 horses owned by former Dixon Comptroller Rita A. Crundwell because of “burdensome” costs, according to a federal court filing this week.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

Former Dixon comptroller Rita Crundwell pleaded “not guilty” in federal court in Rockford Monday. She’s accused of stealing 53-million dollars from her hometown over the past 20 years.

The city of Dixon may be out 20-million dollars more than originally thought in the case against its former comptroller. Federal prosecutors have now charged Rita Crundwell with stealing 53-million dollars over the past 22 years. In the original complaint against Crundwell, she was accused of embezzling an estimated 30-million since 2006 to “support her lavish lifestyle.”

The city of Dixon garnered the world’s attention this week with the arrest of the city’s comptroller. Rita Crundwell was charged in federal court with wire fraud, related to more than 3 million dollars missing from the city’s coffers since last Fall. Federal investigators also accuse her of embezzling more than 30-million dollars from the city over the past six years. WNIJ’s Susan Stephens has been following the story all week. She spoke with Jenna Dooley about the case and what she learned about the 58-year-old Dixon native while talking to people who know her.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

Read an interesting twist on this case at www.theatlanticcities.com

DIXON — Rita A. Crundwell, the Dixon city comptroller who was arrested Tuesday on a federal charge of defrauding the City of Dixon of more than $3.2 million in public funds since last fall, was released from federal custody Wednesday. Her freedom while she awaits trial, however, rests on a number of conditions agreed upon by her attorneys, federal prosecutors, and federal magistrate P. Michael Mahoney.