Aspects Of Trump Impeachment Investigation Differ From Past Precedent

Oct 2, 2019

Credit Martin Falbisoner CC by SA 3.0

Questions of precedent come forth as the U.S. House of Representatives conducts an impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump.

One concern among supporters of impeachment is that the U.S. Senate could halt further action if the House votes in favor of impeachment. Aurora University Assistant Professor Matthew Dabros says chamber rules require the Senate to take action, but members could vote to dismiss the charges.

"The House, I could imagine, could sue to compel action on the part of the Senate," he said. Whether they would take that approach or whether or not that approach could be successful, I don’t think we even know yet. It hasn’t even been tested.”

Dabros also says this impeachment investigation differs from those against previous presidents.

"The House has not been called to vote on authorization for the impeachment investigation, which is a break with past precedent as it relates to presidents, but not a full break with precedent because there have been impeachment investigations for judges and other federal officials that have not been authorized by the full House," he said.

Instead, House committees are being directed to continue their investigations under the umbrella of an impeachment inquiry.