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This Gen Z chocolatier puts ancient farming wisdom to work in new ways

Part 2 of TED Radio Hour episode What’s driving generations apart

Louise Mabulo once scoffed at the old wives' tales her grandparents told her about farming. Until she learned the science behind them. As a farmer, she now mixes ancestral knowledge with modern tech.

About Louise Mabulo

Louise Mabulo is the founder of The Cacao Project, which helps create resilient and climate-smart livelihoods for farmers in San Fernando, Camarines Sur, Philippines.

She is a National Geographic Young Explorer, a United Nations Young Champion of the Earth and was featured on Forbes Asia’s "30 Under 30" list of social entrepreneurs as well as BBC's list of "100 Women 2023." She is also the host of the cooking show Simply Sarap, a project of the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs to promote the nation's cuisine and culture.

This segment of the TED Radio Hour was produced by Harsha Nahata and edited by Sanaz Meshkinpour. You can follow us on Facebook @TEDRadioHour and email us at TEDRadioHour@npr.org.

Web Resources

Related TED Playlist: What does family mean?

Related TED Talk: Let your garden grow wild

Related TED Talk: A cleaner world could start in a rice field

NPR Related Links

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Copyright 2024 NPR

Manoush Zomorodi
Manoush Zomorodi is the host of TED Radio Hour. She is a journalist, podcaster and media entrepreneur, and her work reflects her passion for investigating how technology and business are transforming humanity.
Harsha Nahata
Harsha Nahata (she/her) is a producer for TED Radio Hour. She is drawn to storytelling as a way to explore ideas about identity and question dominant narratives.
Sanaz Meshkinpour
[Copyright 2024 NPR]