Guy Stephens

Reporter

Guy Stephens produces news stories for the station, and coordinates our online events calendar, PSAs and Arts Calendar announcements.  In each of these ways, Guy helps keep our listening community informed about what's going on, whether on a national or local level.  Guy's degrees are in music, and he spent a number of years as a classical host on WNIU.  In fact, after nearly 20 years with Northern Public Radio, the best description of his job may be "other duties as required."

Parabon Nanotyping / DeKalb County Sheriff's Office

The DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office has released pictures of what the man who killed a rural Sycamore couple might look like. The images are based on DNA evidence gathered at the home where 85-year-old Patricia Wilson and her son, 64-year-old Robert Wilson, were found dead. 

Investigators determined the two died of blunt force trauma the night of August 14, 2016. The Sheriff’s Office says, despite thousands of man-hours, dozens of search warrants and work with state and national agencies, it has been unable to come up with the name of the killer.

Powering Lives Network - ComEd

Teams of girls will race solar-powered go-karts converted from recycled refrigerators this Saturday in Chicago. They got help from students at Northern Illinois University.

NIU engineering students worked with the girls participating in the ComEd Icebox Derby. NIU students had been working on designs since last September.

Guy Stephens/ WNIJ

The Freeport Art Museum created an artist-in-residence position. So what does that mean, at least in Freeport?

In the city's downtown, a grassy vacant lot gets some attention. A group of young women, coached by several adults, spray-painted phrases like “good vibes only" and "women in power" on the exposed side wall of a building next door. 

Brian Nissen owns the building, where he and his wife run Abet Books & Games. He was happy to give permission for the mural.

Guy Stephens/ WNIJ

A couple of years ago, Ronald Reagan’s first boyhood home in Dixon was, as The Washington Post put it, “falling apart.” Today, things are looking much better. But the museum’s director says there’s still more to be done.

Guy Stephens/WNIJ

Putting up a mural is often a community event. The art can be a point of pride for residents. But what happens when the paint peels? One city is trying to figure that out.

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