Battle For The Senate: Candidates In Key Races Respond To Kavanaugh Allegations

Updated at 9:58 a.m. ET As the confirmation vote for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh neared, both parties had seen potential political benefits for them in the upcoming midterm elections. For Republicans, it was a chance to energize the base by putting another conservative justice on the court, potentially reshaping it for a generation. For Democrats, the specter of rolling back abortion rights, the Affordable Care Act and more was a way to further energize an already engaged liberal...

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As of Monday, there are 50 days until Election Day. And in the race for Illinois governor, debate season is finally getting underway.

Illinois wildlife managers are closely watching for signs of a 100 % fatal disease in deer, known as Chronic Wasting Disease.  The disease eventually renders the native White-Tailed Deer unable to run and to behave normally.

What Is Feeding The Grid?

Sep 17, 2018
Carl Nelson/Spencer Tritt

Wind, solar, and nuclear are some of the energy options available to Illinois consumers. This week on Morning Edition, the WNIJ news team explores how these affect the quality of life in northern Illinois in 2018 and beyond.

Wind: The "Third Crop"

Wind is sometimes called the "third crop" by farmers.

Reporter Susan Stephens has been following the development of wind farms in northern Illinois. She says the term is used because so often the turbines are placed on farms.

Statewide, with host Sean Crawford, brings you reports and conversations from in and around Illinois. 

Sarah Smarsh grew up in rural Kansas — the fifth generation to farm the same land, riding tractors where her ancestors rode wagons. There was never enough money and prospects were few. She was part of the what has become popularized as the white working class. But back then, she didn't know it.

Fall 2018 Listener Book Swap

Sep 14, 2018

September is National Literacy Month and we’re celebrating with a listener book swap September 17-28. Our doors will be open Monday through Friday from 8:30 to 4:30.

The idea is simple. Stop by our DeKalb studios with a book – or several - for the “swap table" and peruse favorite books from staff and fellow listeners while you're here. You’re free to go home with some fresh reads, or leave the treasures behind for stocking the WNIJ/WNIU Little Free Library.

The Sound of Science - "Marshmallow Explosion"

Sep 14, 2018

J: Welcome to The Sound of Science on WNIJ. I’m Jeremy Benson from NIU STEM Outreach, and I’m in the studio with Kate Powers. Kate, today we have a question from Lydia that is making me laugh just thinking about it. Lydia wants to know why Peeps marshmallows expand so much when you microwave them.

K: I love this question Jeremy! Not only is it fun to blow up a marshmallow by nuking it, but it is a great example of one of the basic laws of chemistry.

J: Microwaving a marshmallow demonstrates a basic law of chemistry? That seems…strange.

Technology changing access and outcomes in abortion debate

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

More than 100 people were waiting to be rescued from homes and vehicles Friday morning in New Bern, N.C., after Hurricane Florence brought severe flooding to the area. Officials say more than 100 people have already been rescued in the area overnight.

Six swift water rescue teams have been working since Thursday afternoon to evacuate individuals and families, in some cases, from the roofs of their homes, the New Bern Public Information Officer Colleen Roberts said Friday afternoon.

Sessions from Studio A - Dina Bach

Sep 13, 2018
Carl Nelson / WNIJ

Dina Bach performs "You and Me" in WNIJ's Studio A.

Dina Bach performs "Slow Dance" in WNIJ's Studio A.

Find the music of Dina Bach at dinabachmusic.com.

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News From NPR

Updated at 5:03 p.m. ET

President Trump issued his most forceful defense yet of his embattled Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Tuesday.

Speaking to reporters during a press conference with Poland's president, Trump called Kavanaugh "a great man" and said that he feels "terribly" for the federal appeals court judge and his family.

The Supreme Court has allowed a lower-court ruling to take effect, compelling disclosure of the big contributions behind explicitly political ads by nonprofit groups — what's often called dark money.

The court set aside an order issued by Chief Justice John Roberts on Saturday. The social welfare group Crossroads GPS, a defendant in the lawsuit, fought to stall disclosure while it prepares to appeal. It failed in the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals and then appealed to the Supreme Court.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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