Kwame Raoul

Illinois’ Attorney General is suing e-cigarette maker JUUL Labs, alleging the company intentionally hooked teens on vaping.


Office of the Illinois Attorney General

Illinois has joined over a dozen states in asking the federal government for details on a decision to stop considering requests from immigrants seeking to remain in the country for medical treatment and other hardships.

 

Illinois Attorney General Kwame Raoul says the lack of information has left sick patients and their families "afraid, traumatized, and uncertain of their future health and well-being."

CHRIS HUNKELER / FLICKR: ATTRIBUTION-SHAREALIKE 2.0 GENERIC (CC BY-SA 2.0)

The Illinois Senate last week approved increased protections for those who use alternative electric and gas suppliers. 

 

Consumers leave their public utility companies with promises they’ll save a few dollars on their monthly bills. Private suppliers may even offer free electricity in exchange for a contract. 

But state Sen. Kimberly Lightford, a Democrat from Maywood, said many end up paying more.

Prosecutors Seek New Sentence In Laquan McDonald Case

Feb 11, 2019
Office of the Illinois Attorney General

Prosecutors on Monday asked Illinois' highest court to review the less than seven year prison sentence for the white Chicago police officer who was convicted in the shooting death of black teenager Laquan McDonald.

MATTY RING / FLICKR

A state law requiring police departments to keep statistics on the race of motorists they pull over is set to expire, and debate is underway about whether the 14-year-old program is effective or simply an expensive, burdensome task for officers.

The landmark study to determine whether Illinois police engage in racial profiling on the roadways — a practice derisively described as combatting the offense of "driving while black" — was one of the major pieces of legislation achieved by former President Barack Obama when he served in the Illinois Senate.

The Senate has approved another bump-stock ban.

 

The Senate voted 38-10 Thursday on Sen. Kwame Raoul's plan. It would outlaw the manufacture or possession of bump stocks or trigger cranks which turn rifles into assault-style weapons. It's the device the gunman used in the Las Vegas mass shooting last October.

Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

The Illinois General Assembly is considering whether people should be allowed to sue to block regulatory decisions of state government. The state’s business community says that’s dangerous for the economy.

The legislation would change the rules surrounding decisions on things like construction permits. Typically, input on those decisions are limited to a state agency and a business applying for a permit. Anyone who proves they would be “adversely affected” by a project could sue to get its permit revoked.

CANDIDATES' CAMPAIGNS

How would contenders for the state's top legal office have handled the budget stalemate?

One of the limitations of modern political debates is that candidates are usually only asked what they'll do. But in this era of political dysfunction and governmental obstruction, it can be just as important to know what a candidate might choose not to do.

Illinois Senate Democrats made another attempt Friday to satisfy the demands of Gov. Bruce Rauner’s economic agenda.

The Republican governor has said the expense of workers' compensation insurance has driven businesses out of the state.

Sen. Kwame Raoul, D-Chicago, sponsored legislation meant to bring costs down.

"I know workers' comp. I’ve practiced workers' comp on behalf of employers," he said during debate. "This, if implemented right, will save employers money, and I urge an aye vote."

Jenna Dooley

Leaders in the Illinois Senate are pressuring members to vote this week on a massive compromise. It would include a state budget.

Illinois General Assembly

A Chicago Democrat is now calling Republican Governor Bruce Rauner “a gentleman.”

That’s after invoking slavery to illustrate what he says are extreme policies from Rauner.

Kwame Raoul is an African-American state senator representing Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood. Reporters asked him about meeting Governor Rauner halfway during this budget impasse.

“It depends on what the premise of what he wants,” Raoul said. “He could say he wants to put me in slavery, right? Should I meet him halfway?”