World War II

On this episode of Statewide, we learn why some colleges say there is too much emphasis on standardized tests in the admissions process.  There is a growing movement to drop the requirement or place less of a priority on scores. 

Is an historic home a good fit for you?  Many are bypassing newly built houses for ones that have more character.  But they can be a lot of work.  We'll find out more. 

And a new proposal threatens to end minor league baseball in some Midwest communities.   These stories and more on Statewide.   

Chase Cavanaugh

Northern Illinois was home to several German POW camps during World War II. A Hampshire man got to know one camp personally, in more ways than one.

In 1944, Hampshire was home to the J.B. Inderrieden cannery, which packed local peas and sweet corn. John Fenzel Jr., then a 12-year old paperboy, overheard the city mayor and farm managers discussing a labor shortage at one of the local restaurants.

Vicki Snyder-Chura / Rochelle Twp High School

One Rochelle-area teenager used the occasion of Veterans Day to honor his great-grandfather by sharing an important part of their family's history.

Rochelle Township High School Senior John Combs spent only a few Veterans Days with his great-grandfather, who died 11 years ago. But it could have been much worse for his family. Combs turned a class assignment into an opportunity to write an essay about his great-grandfather James Combs and how he was mistaken for a ghost during World War II.

Chase Cavanaugh

Local veterans and volunteers recently repainted a World War II-era tank in DeKalb's Memorial Park but, in the process, covered up the stenciled name "Donna" that identified the memorial relic.

That slight will soon be rectified,  according to  American Legion Post 66 Commander Daniel Gallagher, whose organization was responsible -- along with the Veterans of Foreign Wars and others -- for refurbishing the tank.