Utility bills

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The pandemic and accompanying stay-at-home orders have greatly affected many regional services, including utilities.

Governor J.B. Pritzker’s stay-at-home order and the accompanying months of social distancing have greatly affected what buildings remain open, and where people spend their time. 

Modern life requires electricity, and more people at home has changed how it’s consumed.  Aleksi Paaso is the Director of Distribution Planning at ComEd.  He said the times of day in which people use the most electricity haven’t shifted, but the system’s still been affected.

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The Illinois Senate last week approved increased protections for those who use alternative electric and gas suppliers. 

 

Consumers leave their public utility companies with promises they’ll save a few dollars on their monthly bills. Private suppliers may even offer free electricity in exchange for a contract. 

But state Sen. Kimberly Lightford, a Democrat from Maywood, said many end up paying more.

City of Rockford

Outgoing Rockford Mayor Larry Morrissey will discuss a potential utility tax this evening.  

The city faces a $5 million budget shortfall, mostly due to an increase in pension costs.  In 1999 and 2001, the Illinois General Assembly lowered the public safety retirement age from 55 to 50, guaranteed annual 3 percent cost of living increases and agreed  to continue paying spouses of retired firefighters and police officers who die the same pension they got while alive.  A report says pensioners are also living longer after they retire.  

New Legislation For State To Pay Up On Utility Bills

Jan 15, 2016
State of Illinois

State Senator Andy Manar has filed legislation that would allow Illinois to catch up on payments to the city of Springfield's utility.

The budget impasse has left the state with a mountain of debt.  

Manar represents a portion of Springfield. He says the state needs to take responsibility for its bills.  

"We owe them. We should pay them as a state government. The tax payers of Springfield shouldn't bear the burden of paying the state's bills for electricity,” Manar said.