social media

Wikipedia Commons

A recently proposed plan would add sexting to the list of topics covered in Illinois sex education courses.

Middle and high schools in the state would be required to discuss with students the social, academic and legal consequences of sending or receiving sexually explicit images.

It was introduced by State Representative Maurice West of Rockford. He says a constituent reached out with the idea to expand a law passed last year about teaching consent.

Last month, Northern Illinois University police investigated a potential threat circulating on social media.

The university sent a late-night “community awareness message” telling students and staff the threat wasn’t credible. But many NIU students had already seen the rumors online and were not satisfied with the university’s short response.

That morning, November 18, Kaitlyn Frisby woke up to Facebook and Twitter reactions about the situation from her classmates -- questions like: How long did they talk to the person? Are they in police custody?

Photo by Spencer Tritt

 

Jim Vera teaches government at Oswego East High School. He often has his students, mostly sophomores, stand in all four corners of the classroom. The corners are marked "Agree," "Disagree," "Strongly agree" and "Strongly disagree."

 

He starts small. Do we have good sports programs here? They all pick a corner. Then the debate escalates until, eventually, they're discussing topics like if it's okay to burn the American flag. 

 

 

Last February, a threat made on social media forced a lock-down across the DeKalb County School District.

It was a part of a wave of threats made to schools in days and weeks following the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida. The incident in DeKalb did not end in tragedy, but it made school district officials think about their emergency protocols.

Graphic by WNIJ

Unwanted social media messages are now on the list of behaviors that can be cited when petitioning to file for stalking “no-contact order.”

That’s one of the hundreds of new Illinois laws that went into effect in the new year.

Previously, phone calls, text messages and emails were included, but not messages from platforms like Facebook or Twitter.

FLICKR User Victoria Pickering

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. marching arm-in-arm with other civil rights activists. Cesar Chavez hoisting a picket sign in a farm workers' strike. Gloria Steinem rallying other feminists for equal rights.

 

During the 1960s and into the 1970s, amid the turbulence of protests for civil rights and against the Vietnam War, every movement seemed to have a famous face — someone at a podium or at the front of a march who possessed a charismatic style, soaring oratory and an inspiring message.

Not so today.

"#kryboard #enter #social #network" By Flickr User Victor / (CC X 2.0)

A law recently signed by Governor Bruce Rauner will make it easier for Illinois residents to access family members' social media accounts after they die.

      

 

The legislation requires that tech companies, such as Facebook, offer users a chance to name a beneficiary who would be given access to the account after they die or become incapacitated.

 

Hillside Democratic Representative Chris Welch sponsored the law. 

 

Social Media Privacy Rules Extended To Students

Dec 26, 2013

A new Illinois law aims to protect internet privacy for students. It was inspired by a similar law approved last year.