science

The Sound of Science - "Coffee"

Aug 10, 2018

Kate: Welcome to the Sound of Science on WNIJ. I’m Kate Powers, and today’s question comes from Alex who wants to know why coffee tastes so weird. With me is STEM Outreach’s resident coffee enthusiast Sam Watt. Sam loves his coffee so much, he even went out of his way to pick and roast his own coffee in a coffee grove in Cambodia!

Don Hamerman / University of Illinois

If you create a million new chemicals, chances are one or two of them could be a life-saving drug. A new research study finds that this shotgun approach to drug discovery can be accelerated with the help of bacteria.

Researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Southampton in England found a way to engineer bacteria cells to create millions of unique chemical compounds.

NIU Scientists Push To Forefront In 'March For Science'

Apr 22, 2017
Susan Stephens

Scientists across the country will step out of the lab today and into the streets, including locations like Chicago, for the “March for Science.” The event coincides with Earth Day.

Scientists think it's time to raise awareness for their respective fields. As a result, many faculty members have found themselves pushed into more active roles.

Reed Scherer is a professor of Geology at NIU.

Illinois State Museum

The Tully Monster Mystery has been solved. New research published in the journal "Nature" sheds light on Illinois' state fossil.

It’s been about 300 million years since the strange creature known as the Tully Monster swam in the salty waters of central Illinois. The mystery of just what it was has been brewing since a fossil hunter discovered it near Morris in 1955.

KWMU

Women who are an unhealthy weight during their first pregnancy might have a false sense of security if their babies are born with no complications. But a new study out of Saint Louis University suggests complications can still arise when the women get pregnant for a second time — even if, by then, they have reached a healthy weight.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

Wednesday was “change the world” day at Northern Illinois University. And since the students were away on Spring Break, it was a good opportunity to invite local high schoolers interested in medical careers to meet one of their own.  

Cancer May Be Caused By Bad Luck

Jan 5, 2015
MostlyScience.com

Most cancers can be attributed to bad luck rather than risk factors, like smoking. 

That’s according to a study in the journal Science.

Results show two thirds of the cancer types analyzed were caused by chance mutations. However, some of the most common and deadly cancers are still influenced by lifestyle.