Kelly Cassidy

Dems Move Abortion Bill Late Sunday Night

May 27, 2019
BRIAN MACKEY / NPR ILLINOIS

Late Sunday night, Illinois Democrats advanced legislation meant to protect abortion rights in case Roe v. Wade is overturned.

It would require insurance companies to cover abortions as part of pregnancy-related care and prevent abortion providers from being criminally charged, including for late-term abortions when medically necessary.

Sponsoring state Rep. Kelly Cassidy, a Democrat from Chicago, said it’s about trusting women and their doctors to make the best choice for their health and lifestyle.

RICK PROCTOR / UNSPLASH

Lawmakers see chance for green with recreational marijuana.

Marijuana legalization is getting another look in Illinois, particularly for the money it could bring the state. The state has overdue bills nearing $9 billion after a more than two-year budget stalemate, and some argue a little extra cash could go a long way.

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Accusations of harassment from a campaign worker against her supervisor and close aide to Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan, Kevin Quinn, led to Quinn’s firing last month. Madigan is still struggling with the ripple effects from Alaina Hampton’s claims, with some observers predicting this could be the downfall for the powerful politician.

Hampton’s story has also brought attention to how political campaigns deal with sexual harassment.

Katie Finlon / WNIJ

A major Wisconsin city recently passed a law saying augmented reality game developers like Niantic, the creators of Pokémon Go, must have a permit in order to use parks as game landmarks.

Now, a similar Illinois bill is in the works.

Illinois lawmaker Kelly Cassidy is again trying to ban counseling that tries to make gay kids, straight.

Sexual orientation conversion therapy can cause depression, anxiety and self-destructive behavior, according to reports from psychologists. A proposal to make the therapy off limits for minors failed last year in the Illinois House. 

The CEO of the gay rights group Equality Illinois, Bernard Cherkasov, is hopeful it will pass this time.