IDPH

Illinois Dept. of Public Health

Illinois has now surpassed 10,000 cases of COVID-19. Saturday, Boone County reported its first two cases.

Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker announced a fourth field hospital location for treating COVID-19 patients. Public health experts are expecting a surge in cases this month.

DeKalb County Health Department

As the coronavirus spreads, local health departments and hospitals are monitoring the situation and making plans. 

To keep abreast of the situation, municipalities are in constant contact with their counterparts across the state. Lisa Gonzalez, Public Health Administrator for the DeKalb County Health Department, explains. 

“We have the Region 1 Health Departments which are the 9 counties in northwest Illinois, but we also work with Chicago region health departments and statewide health departments as well," she said. 

"Syringe and Vaccine" by Flickr User NIAID / (CC X 2.0)

The Illinois Department of Public Health says vaccination is an excellent defense against two prominent diseases. 

The first is Hepatitis A. This is a highly contagious liver disease that can cause symptoms such as fatigue, stomach pain, and jaundice. Public Health Director Ngozi Ezike said the disease is widespread, and there’s been an outbreak in Illinois since September 2018.

“It has actually been nationwide, over 30 states, But in Illinois specifically, we’ve had 177 related cases, and one death associated with that," she said.

Flickr user Michael Chen "Pills" (CC BY 2.0) bit.ly/1RgH2Na

The Illinois Department of Public Health is cautioning residents against the overuse of antibiotics.

Antibiotics are effective at fighting bacterial diseases. But the most common conditions for which people visit a doctor are cold and flu, which are viruses.  IDPH spokeswoman Melaney Arnold says the effectiveness of antibiotics on other diseases creates a sort of expectation in patients.

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A year ago, lawmakers decided to change school health examination requirements. They added screenings for social and emotional development, but the details are still being worked out.

The law leaves it up to the Illinois Department of Public Health to put together the rules regarding these screenings. As the law reads right now, it’s vague. How they’ll be done, who receives them, and the tools needed to do so isn’t spelled out. That’s what the stakeholders are trying to figure out.

"Syringe and Vaccine" by Flickr User NIAID / (CC X 2.0)

The Illinois Department of Public Health says it isn’t too early for residents to get their flu shot.

Flu season typically runs from October through March, and it takes about two weeks for the vaccine to take effect. That’s why Public Health Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jennifer Layden says it’s a good time to get immunized. 

"There's several options," she said. "There's multiple flu vaccines. The main message is we do not recommend, nor does the CDC, that individuals get the nasal spray."

Intel Free Press/Flickr

Vehicle accidents are a leading cause of death for children. In 2011, the most recent data from the Illinois Department of Public Health, 11.5% of children ages 1 through 4 died in a car accident. There are measures parents can take to keep their young children safe. However, a new survey shows many don't.  

Early Finding For West Nile Virus In Sterling

Jul 18, 2017

A batch of mosquitoes recently tested positive for West Nile Virus in Whiteside County. Health officials say it’s an early result in the testing season.

Health officials have been testing for West Nile Virus since 2002.

Gene Johnston, Director of Environmental Health at the Whiteside County Health Department, says it’s common to get positive results -- but usually in August or September.

"Box of Kleenex" by Flickr User m01229 / (CC X 2.0)

Cases of influenza are spiking nationwide and across the state as public health officials urge that it's not too late to get a flu shot.

Hospitals across Illinois counties are seeing more people coming in with flu-like symptoms and testing positive for the illness. 

Common symptoms include a fever of 100 degrees or higher, along with a cough and sore throat. 

Cases Of HIV Continue To Drop In Illinois

Oct 31, 2016

A new report shows there were a little more than 1,500 cases of HIV in the state last year, which is a two percent drop from 2014.

However, Illinois ranks eleventh in the nation for rates of other STD’s like Chlamydia and Syphilis.

Governor Bruce Rauner enacted a law to provide insurance coverage for HIV prevention and treatment medicines.

The Illinois Department of Public Health today announced the following type “AA” and “A” violations of the Nursing Home Care Act. These violations were recorded during the second quarter of 2016.

An “AA” violation is cited when there is a condition or occurrence at the facility that proximately caused a resident’s death.

An “A” violation pertains to a condition in which there is a substantial probability that death or serious mental or physical harm will result, or has resulted.

idph.state.il.us

Illinois health officials are urging anyone with cantaloupes to inspect them following an outbreak of 17 cases identified in the state in 11 counties. Eight of the people are hospitalized.

Tainted cantaloupe from southwestern Indiana is the suspected source of the outbreak that has so far affected more than 140 people from 20 states. Symptoms of the illness include fever, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea. Cases go back as far as July 7.

idph.state.il.us

Officials urge standard flu precautions

A child who attended the Coles County Fair in Charleston last week has been diagnosed with the first case of the H3N2v influenza virus, a variant form of influenza A, in the state. This child has not been hospitalized.

Illinois joins Indiana, Ohio and Hawaii as states which have confirmed this variation of “swine flu” within its borders.