food banks

Spencer Tritt

Around 60% of DeKalb students qualify as low-income, according to the Illinois Report Card. That means they also qualify for reduced or free meals.

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck, schools scrambled to keep providing food for students who rely on their district for much more than education.

The coronavirus pandemic has taught many people a lesson in supply chain economics, not least of all the Midwest Food Bank.

Chase Cavanaugh

A recently revived charity luncheon raised $12,000 this year toward feeding the needy in and around Rockford.

The Mayor’s Hunger Luncheon was started by Rockford Mayor Tom McNamara’s father in the 1980s, and served as a fundraiser for hunger prevention into the late 1990s. After a long hiatus, the event was revived last year and raised $10,000. Mayor McNamara credited this year’s boost in funds to the committee that planned it, greater public visibility, and more local sponsors.

Courtesy of the Batavia Interfaith Food Pantry

Northern Illinois food banks are holding steady, despite the arrival of winter and a continuing government shutdown.

The Sauk Valley Food Bank in Sterling distributes food to pantries in Whiteside and Lee Counties, and outlying areas like Freeport. Executive Director Andrea Hensgen says their work hasn’t been affected much by the shutdown, but there has been a slight change in clientele.

Feeding Illinois

Just ahead of Thanksgiving, Gov. Pat Quinn has announced $4.5 million of funding for Illinois' food banks.

One of seven Illinois residents doesn't know where, or when, they'll get their next meal.

Director of the Greater Chicago Food Depository Kate Maehr says that's a sobering reality any day. But especially around Thanksgiving.

"At a time that we all come together around a table, to celebrate the joy and the fortune that we have, it is unconscionable to think that there are two million people in the state of Illinois who don't have food to eat."