Exelon

What Happens If A School Loses 75% Of Its Revenue?

Jan 7, 2021
Byron CUSD 226

Last summer, Exelon announced its plans to close nuclear power plants in Byron and Dresden. Buster Barton, the Superintendent of Byron’s School District, said taxes from the Byron plant accounted for around 75% of the district’s revenue.

So, what happens if that goes away? What happens when a school loses that much money?

 

New Report: Major Windfall For ComEd At Expense Of Customers

Dec 2, 2020
ComEd

According to  new report out this week shows ComEd is enjoying record profits while its customers pay higher electricity delivery rates than they should be.

The report by the Illinois Public Interest Research Group (PIRG),  show that the 2011 Energy Infrastructure Modernization Act (EIMA) is at the center of ComEd’s "profit machine." 

Victoria Lunacek

Exelon announced Thursday that it intends to retire its Byron Generating Station and Dresden Generating Station in fall 2021. 

Byron is licensed to operate for another 20 years. The company said Byron and Dresden employ more than 1,500 full-time employees and 2,000 supplemental workers during refueling outages.

What Is Feeding The Grid?

Sep 17, 2018
Carl Nelson/Spencer Tritt

Wind, solar, and nuclear are some of the energy options available to Illinois consumers. This week on Morning Edition, the WNIJ news team explores how these affect the quality of life in northern Illinois in 2018 and beyond.

Wind: The "Third Crop"

Wind is sometimes called the "third crop" by farmers.

Reporter Susan Stephens has been following the development of wind farms in northern Illinois. She says the term is used because so often the turbines are placed on farms.

Illinois Issues: State Marches Toward Clean Energy

May 22, 2017
Dylan Blake

Even as a landmark clean-energy plan unravels in Washington, D.C., Illinois is on track to meet the coal emissions-reduction goals it set.

For Dulce Ortiz, the Clean Power Plan was a long-awaited victory.

For years, Ortiz and fellow environmental activists had been trying to get rid of the coal-fired power plant in their hometown of Waukegan. Yet pleas to the energy company, to Waukegan’s mayor, and to Illinois energy regulators all had proven unsuccessful.

Wikimedia Commons

 

You can’t see the Clinton nuclear plant from Clinton. It’s located nine miles out of town. But Clinton felt the impact when Exelon said the plant might close.

They felt it at The Shack, a Clinton diner that’s been serving up hamburgers and hand-packed milkshakes for nearly a century.

Wikimedia Commons

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner frequently talks about the need to grow the state's economy. However, manufacturers say the energy law he signed yesterday will make it harder for them to compete.

The law requires residential and business customers to pay a subsidy to Exelon so they can  keep nuclear power plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities open. 

Mark Denzler of the Illinois Manufacturer's Association says the hike in electric rates will cost some of his members millions of dollars per year.

A plan intended to keep two nuclear power plants operating and save thousands of Illinois jobs is on its way to Gov. Bruce Rauner.
 
The Senate voted 32-18 to approve the plan Thursday night just an hour after it got House approval 63-38.
 
The measure provides $235 million a year to Exelon Corp. for 13 years. Exelon counts it as a subsidy for nuclear power producing no gases harmful to the
atmosphere.
 
It allows unprofitable nuclear plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities to stay open.
 

Exelon Generation

Illinois lawmakers are considering whether to approve an energy deal on behalf of Exelon. Without it, the power company says it will close nuclear plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities.

Exelon says there are about 1,500 workers between the two plants, plus thousands of other local jobs that would be affected. Vice President David Fine says the average ComEd residential customer would see her bill go up by less than 25 cents a month over the 10 years of the deal. "And in the first couple years," Fine says, "we anticipate there'll actually be a savings — a rate decrease."

"Satsop Nuclear Power Plant" by Flickr User Tony Webster / (CC BY 2.0)

Illinois legislators are considering whether to approve an energy deal on behalf of power company Exelon.

Without it, the corporation says it will close its nuclear plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities.

Exelon says there are about 1,500 workers between the two plants, plus thousands of other local jobs that would be affected.

Exelon vice president David Fine says the average ComEd residential customer would see her bill go up by less than 25 cents a month over the 10 years of the deal.

Wikimedia Commons

Gov. Bruce Rauner says he wants to protect all the jobs he can at Exelon nuclear plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities.  They're slated to close unless they get help from the state.

energy.gov

A deal may keep Exelon’s Clinton and Quad Cities nuclear plants open for the foreseeable future. The company says it will shut down the plants unless lawmakers pass a bill allowing it to raise electricity rates.  

Fidel Marquez, an executive with Exelon subsidiary ComEd, believes the rate hike will save jobs and keep energy rates competitive.

"It's pretty Basic micro economics, that when you reduce the supply a significant amount, energy prices in the state will rise," he said.  

Wikimedia Commons

Illinois lawmakers introduced an electricity rate increase meant to save two western Illinois nuclear power plants, and their associated jobs.  However, the measure is facing significant opposition.

Exelon, ComEd's parent company, says it's losing money on nuclear power plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities.  Critics say the measure is a bailout -- and the largest rate increase in Illinois history.   Lobbyist Dave Lundy urged lawmakers to reject the plan.

 

Flickr User James Bowe / "Lightbulb" (CC BY 2.0)

The leader of Illinois' largest utility is appealing to lawmakers’ competitive spirits to get them on board with overhauling energy regulations.

ComEd CEO Ann Pramaggiore says many Fortune 500 companies have committed to meeting sustainable energy goals.

"No one has claimed this leadership mantle. New York is in the race. The big California cities are contenders as well. And while they have more technology than New York, their markets are no more robust. Clean energy leadership is Chicago’s for the taking,” Pramaggiore said.

Flickr User James Bowe / "Lightbulb" (CC BY 2.0)

ComEd is working to change how it bills for electricity use. 

They want to charge customers based on how much energy they use when demand is high, rather than what they use overall.  A group of Chicago politicians signed on to a letter with various groups opposing the plan.  This includes the Illinois Public Interest Research Group.  PIRG President Abe Scarr says it confuses customers.

"Satsop Nuclear Power Plant" by Flickr User Tony Webster / (CC BY 2.0)

Exelon Generation says it has formally notified a grid operator of its plans to retire the Quad-Cities Generating Station, one of two Illinois nuclear plants it intends to shut down.

The Quad-City Times reports that the step announced Thursday is one of several procedural notifications Exelon has to make before closing the station in Cordova and another in Clinton.

The company announced on June 2 that it planned to close the plants after the state Legislature failed to approve a financial-support plan.

Exelon To Close Two Illinois Nuclear Plants

Jun 2, 2016
Exelon

Exelon Corp. says it will move forward with plans to shut two Illinois nuclear plants after the Illinois Legislature didn't act on its request for financial support. 

The company announced it will close the Clinton Power Station in Clinton on June 1, 2017, and the Quad Cities Generating Station in Cordova on June 1, 2018. 

Exelon says the locations are its best-performing plants but they have lost $800 million over the last seven years. About 1,500 people work at the plants. 

Exelon

Nuclear energy workers were in Springfield Tuesday in a last-ditch effort to save two of Exelon's Illinois plants.

The energy behemoth says that, unless legislators pass a law by the end of this month, it will shut down the plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities.

Jeff Bartz, who's from Colona, says that would lead to a loss of thousands of jobs and wipe out a big part of the regional tax base. Bartz says nuclear power has advantages.

Exelon May Close Clinton And Quad Cities Nuclear Plants

May 16, 2016
Exelon

  Exelon Corporation says it may close two nuclear power plants in Clinton and the Quad Cities due to operating losses. 

The company claims an abundance of natural gas has pushed down the price of electricity so much that their nuclear operations can no longer remain profitable.  To hold off the closure, Exelon and ComEd are sponsoring legislation that would subsidize these two plants through rate increases.  Exelon spokesman Paul Dempsey explains. 

Flickr User James Bowe / "Lightbulb" (CC BY 2.0)

The nuclear, coal and renewable-energy industries find themselves vying for the attention of Illinois lawmakers this legislative session.

Lawmakers are trying to work on the state budget impasse, but energy providers hope they will focus on legislation to deal with Illinois' long-term power needs before the scheduled May 31 adjournment.

The Springfield bureau of Lee Enterprises newspapers reports that all three industries back measures that they say are vital to the state's energy future and economy.

Wikimedia Commons

First, Exelon said that it would wait a year before making decisions on two money-losing nuclear plants in northern Illinois. Now, the Chicago-based energy company says it will also wait a year before deciding what to do with the Clinton nuclear power plant in DeWitt County.

Exelon says a key factor in their decision is an announcement by the Clinton plant’s regional grid operator MISO that it may reform its auction process for setting supplier capacity. The process is a key factor in determining revenue for electric power plants.

Exelon Amping Up Threat To Close Nukes

May 6, 2015
Exelon

The company says it's not a bailout and instead argues it’s trying to level the playing field.  Illinois already gives some incentives for renewable sources, like energy and wind.

Supporters of Exelon's measure, like Democratic Representative Larry Walsh Junior of Joliet,  say nuclear power deserves that push.

"Nuclear energy plants provide Illinois with a reliable, carbon-free solution for their energy needs. And we need to do all we can to preserve these plants."

Exelon Wants Reward For Low-Carbon Power

Feb 26, 2015
Exelon

After issuing warnings it may have to close down half its nuclear fleet,  Exelon has introduced a proposal it says would keep them open. It signals the start of what's expected to be a long debate over energy policy in Illinois.

Exelon is one of the biggest and most powerful corporations in the state.

"No one from Exelon has ever denied that the company is profitable. It is," said Joe Dominguez, Senior Vice President of Exelon Generation.

Exelon

A spokesman for Exelon's Byron station confirms there are economic pressures on the Byron, Clinton and Quad Cities facilities. The spokesman tells WNIJ that Exelon sent lawmakers information in the hopes they gain a better understanding of the value of these nuclear facilities to the state economy and the impact of closing at-risk facilities early.

How Real Is The Threat To Close Nuke Plants?

Mar 11, 2014
Exelon Corporation

One energy analyst says discussion about closing some of Exelon's nuclear power plants in Illinois should be viewed as a real possibility.

Illinois At The Center Of Nuclear Waste Debate

Nov 1, 2013
Exelon Corporation

A U.S. Senate proposal would address the need for a permanent storage site for the nation’s nuclear waste. But an Illinois watchdog has concerns how it might affect the state in the short-term.

Exelon is at the center of an investigation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The agency says the Illinois-based company “deliberately” misled regulators about the status of funds set aside to decommission power plants, including the facility in Byron.

Nuclear Plant Upgrades

Mar 20, 2012

 

Exelon Energy says it has finished upgrading equipment at a northern Illinois nuclear plant.