All Things Considered

Monday through Friday, 3pm - 7pm; Saturday and Sunday, 4pm - 5pm
  • Hosted by Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers and Ari Shapiro
  • Local Host Jenna Dooley

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world.  Every weekday afternoon, hosts Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers and Ari Shapiro bring listeners breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  WNIJ airs a one-hour edition of the program at 4pm on Saturday and Sunday.

The last time the U.S. unemployment rate was roughly as low as the 3.7 percent it is now — December 1969 — the economy was overheating, inflation was spiking and a short recession soon followed.

Could that happen again?

Probably not anytime soon, most economists say. Yet there are some surprising similarities between today's economy and the late 1960s, when the unemployment rate remained mostly below 4 percent for four straight years.

Manufacturing could face a slowdown

Oct 5, 2018

Manufacturers have been adding 20,000 to 30,000 jobs per month since the summer of 2017. But that upward trend took a pause in August, with a 3,000 jobs decline in manufacturing. It could be a one-month blip, but there are other signs that manufacturing could be poised for a slowdown. The strong dollar is making U.S. exports more expensive abroad. Escalating trade tensions and retaliatory tariffs imposed by U.S. trading partners could further hurt overseas demand for goods made in the USA.

(U.S. Edition) The September jobs report is gaining most of the attention on Friday morning, with forecasters expecting signs of steady jobs growth. But one thing that appears to be leveling off is the manufacturing sector. We look into why. We also look at Walmart’s efforts into offering better job training to workers after the company joined about a dozen others in a pledge to train millions of workers in the next five years.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … After intense pressure from shareholders against the move, Unilever does a U-turn on plans to scrap it’s dual-share structure and shift its headquarters away from the U.K. to the Netherlands. Then, Russian president Vladimir Putin is in India Friday meeting with the country's prime minister Narendra Modi. The two countries signed a new defense-weapons deal, but it could provoke the U.S. into imposing fresh sanctions on India. Afterwards, anger with the status-quo political environment is an issue for countries all over the world.

Why the Facebook breach isn't just about Facebook

Oct 5, 2018

Facebook announced this week that it had suffered its biggest hack ever, compromising the accounts of at least 50 million users. Part of the reason a Facebook hack is so scary is that the social network connects to so many other apps and services. You might use it to log in to Spotify or Tinder or OpenTable — a whole string of apps might have your information connected to your profile. So far, Facebook has said hackers did not access any third-party apps. But it's still investigating the scope of the hack.

Facebook announced this week that it had suffered its biggest hack ever compromising the accounts of at least 50 million users. Part of the reason a Facebook hack is so scary is that the social network connects to so many other apps and services. You might use it to log in to Spotify or Tinder or OpenTable — a whole string of apps might have your information connected to your profile. So far, Facebook has said hackers did not access any third-party apps. But it's still investigating the scope of the hack.

On Friday, we'll get the latest jobs figures for the month of September. Economists are expecting a strong report, with unemployment expected to drop a bit from an already low rate. We're also getting awfully close to the holiday hiring season, and sales are expected to be pretty strong, too. But with the unemployment rate as low as it is, what will retailers have to do to find the workers they need? 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Block by block, the place you were born and raised, can determine how far you get ahead in life.

A new online tool shows that geography plays an outsized role in a child's destiny.

Called the Opportunity Atlas, it was developed by Harvard economist Raj Chetty and his colleagues. It's a map that uses tax and U.S. Census data to track people's incomes from one generation to the next.

Copyright 2018 Wisconsin Public Radio. To see more, visit Wisconsin Public Radio.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Sarah Stewart likes to think about what happens when planets collide. She uses two actual cannons to simulate those massive impacts. Here's one firing in her lab at UC Davis.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Firing in three, two, one.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2018 Alaska Public Media. To see more, visit Alaska Public Media.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

How will the USMCA trade deal impact China?

Oct 4, 2018

Under the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, manufacturers need to source more parts from the member countries to avoid penalties. That could cost China.

Earlier this week, President Donald Trump said that the trade deal would provide a big boost for North American businesses and jobs.

“We’re going to be a manufacturing powerhouse and allow us to reclaim a supply chain that has been off-shored to the world because of unfair trade issues,” Trump told reporters.

All I want for Christmas is a little help

Oct 4, 2018

Forecasts are predicting strong holiday sales this season, which means retailers, warehouses and other businesses are going to need more employees. But with a labor market this tight, we'll look at how companies are competing for seasonal workers. Then, more than a million children had their identities stolen last year, costing families $542 million. We'll look at what makes kids easy targets and what parents are doing about it. Plus, we'll take you to the world's biggest Elvis Presley festival. It isn't in Nashville or Graceland, but the seaside village of Porthcawl, Wales. 

A misunderstood tech giant and the "nerds" who created it

Oct 4, 2018

Reddit is one of the most visited websites on the internet. But it gets considerably less attention in the national conversation about tech giants and social media. If you've never heard of Reddit, it's a site where anonymous users can post links, whose popularity is determined by other users voting those links up or down.

Last week, 90 million people had to log back into Facebook following a cyberattack.

Maybe you were one of them, and maybe you even took a minute to change your password. But this data breach goes way beyond Facebook, and it's worth wading into the site's thicket of privacy settings to see where else you might have been compromised.

Health care costs keep going up and businesses are passing some of those costs down to their employees. A new Kaiser Family Foundation survey found that employers are paying on average about $20,000 a year for each employee's family health plan — that’s a 5 percent increase from last year. We look into how those increasing costs mean additional costs for employees.

 

 

 

(Markets Edition) The 10-year bond yield is actually up 3.19 percent, one of several signs that the U.S. economy is gaining strength. We talk to economist Diane Swonk for more. In healthcare news, a Kaiser Family Foundation survey has found that employers are paying more for each employee’s health plans. We look at how the employees are also paying more.

An annual assessment by the Center for Political Accountability shows many S&P 500 companies are spending less on direct donations to political races and election-related causes than in recent years. Additionally, those S&P 500 companies that are still making political donations are moving toward more transparency. Changing political winds and growing publicity risks have created a climate in which major corporations are finding it’s safer to cut direct political ties.

Beth Kobliner on how parents can maximize FAFSA's potential

Oct 4, 2018

If you're the parent of a high-schooler, there's a "talk" you should be having with them. No, it's not the one you think.

On Oct. 1, the federal financial aid application process — also known as FAFSA — opened for the 2019-2020 academic year, which could bring to light questions about the economic realities of a college education and more importantly, who's footing the bill and how. 

(U.S. Edition) A stronger U.S. economy means that more U.S. bonds have been selling off, which means a boost to the 10-year treasury yield. Marketplace’s Tracey Samuelson helps explain more. Then we look into the story of Chinese agents using computer chips to possibly hack into computers used by Amazon, Apple and the U.S. government. Also, a year ago Friday, the bombshell story about Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein’s predatory behavior surfaced, sparking the #MeToo movement.

Big banks fear recession after Brexit

Oct 4, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... The U.K. could tip in to another recession after it leaves the European Union, warns the Royal Bank of Scotland's (RBS) chief executive Ross McEwan. Two Japanese giants have made a deal to create a "mobility network" intended to change public transport, healthcare and office work – we hear about a new multimillion dollar partnership between Toyota and Softbank. It's Super Thursday in the U.K., the biggest day of the year for publishers releasing new books for a place in the Christmas bestseller lists.

How #MeToo has (or hasn't) changed business as usual, one year later

Oct 4, 2018

Nearly one year ago, news regarding the deep-rooted, sexually harassing behavior from Hollywood power player Harvey Weinstein shone a light on a culture of impropriety and predatory behavior that had permeated the entertainment industry. It also ignited the #MeToo movement, where people felt empowered to share their stories of harassment in an effort to bring the offenders — some of them powerful or famous — to some kind of justice. The movement and the sense of awareness it has brought with it has spread to other areas of society, include the corporate workplace.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Donald Trump has described himself for decades as a self-made billionaire, claiming that he built his fortune using a onetime loan from his father.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Dateline:
A couple of thousand Minnesota high school students will flood the Orpheum Theater in Minneapolis Thursday for a matinee performance of "Hamilton." It's the second local event for "EduHam," which uses the hit show to teach academic skills.

At the first such performance, last Thursday, a horde of students swarmed into the theater. Teenagers whooped in excitement.

Adrienne Diercks, the founder of Project Success, watched. This all started after three different people approached her three years ago to ask if she had seen "Hamilton."

The race to grab a giant slice of the self-driving car market got a little more heated when Honda announced it will invest $750 million in General Motors' autonomous car unit, with an additional $2 billion coming over the next 12 years.

That’s a good chunk of money flowing to a set of products a long way from hitting the market. “This is a really expensive venture,” said Michelle Krebs, auto industry analyst at AutoTrader. “We don’t know when they’ll be ubiquitous and profitable.”

The big banks are seeing an increase in cyberthreats, and these attacks are only becoming more sophisticated.

Pages