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Up First briefing: Biden impeachment inquiry; GOP debate takeaways; get more fiber

Republican presidential candidates, from left, North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, entrepreneur Vivek Ramaswamy, Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., and former Vice President Mike Pence, at a debate hosted by FOX Business and Univision, Wednesday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif.
Mark Terrill
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AP
Republican presidential candidates, from left, North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, entrepreneur Vivek Ramaswamy, Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., and former Vice President Mike Pence, at a debate hosted by FOX Business and Univision, Wednesday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif.

Good morning. You're reading the Up First newsletter. Subscribe here to get it delivered to your inbox, and listen to the Up First podcast for all the news you need to start your day.

Today's top stories

Seven Republican presidential hopefuls made their case for the GOP nomination at last night's debate in California. They spent the night attacking President Biden, each other, and former President Donald Trump — who skipped the event. These are six takeaways from the night.

  • NPR's Danielle Kurtzleben says the debate was chaotic. There was a lot of bickering and several meme-able moments. But Kurtzleben tells Up First that she didn't see any standout candidates and Republican voters left the debate without gaining clarity on the candidates' policy differences. 


The House Oversight Committee is set to hold its first hearing for President Biden's impeachment inquiry today. Meanwhile, members of their party battle over spending bills and a government shutdown looms two days away. The committee is focused on the president's son, Hunter, and his business dealings. They allege Hunter exploited the Biden name and that Biden knew about it prior to his presidency. Read what you can expect from the hearing and watch it live here later this morning.

  • It could be a very long day as the committee rehashes evidence, according to NPR's Claudia Grisales. She spoke to Committee Chairman James Comer, who said the media has been getting it wrong about their claims. Democrats are expected to argue that Republicans haven't connected the dots between the president and his son, and the hearing is distracting from the government shutdown threat.


Travis King, the American soldier who crossed the border into North Korea in July, has been transferred into U.S. custody and is on his way home, according to U.S. officials. A Defense Department official tells NPR he is headed to a military hospital in Texas.

When it comes to climate change, it's not often that you hear good news. But countries are setting records deploying climate-friendly technology, and there could be a path toward net-zero emissions by 2050, according to a new report from the International Energy Agency. The hopeful message is more optimistic than the agency's 2021 report. However, it also shows that the transition from fossil fuels to clean energy will have to speed up even more in the coming decade.

Picture show

<em>Winnie-the-Pooh: The Deforested Edition</em> is a word-for-word republishing of the A.A. Milne classic, with one arresting change: all of the trees have been cut down.
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Who Gives A Crap
Winnie-the-Pooh: The Deforested Edition is a word-for-word republishing of the A.A. Milne classic, with one arresting change: all of the trees have been cut down.

Oh bother! Where are all the trees? Toilet paper company Who Gives A Crap has reimagined A.A. Milne's classic Winnie the Pooh book, with illustrations where all the trees have been cut down. Winnie-the-Pooh: Deforested Edition aims to spark conversation between parents and children about how daily habits affect the environment, according to Danny Alexander, the company's co-founder. See examples of the jarring illustrations and read about why deforestation and sustainability are more complicated than they seem.

Life advice

Tanja Ivanova / Getty Images
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Getty Images

Fiber is a dietary superhero — but most Americans aren't eating enough of it. Diets rich in fiber have been linked to a lower risk of major health problems, including obesity, Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain cancers. Plus, it can help keep you regular and your gut healthy. NPR's Life Kit has these expert tips on how to add more fiber to your diet:

  • Eat a variety of plant-based foods, like fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans, seeds and nuts.
  • Add fiber to your staple meals. Try adding avocado to your salad and chia seeds to your yogurt or snacking on popcorn. 
  • Don't forget the freezer aisle: Frozen berries tend to be cheaper and last longer than fresh ones, for example. 
  • Start slowly and drink plenty of water. This will give your gastrointestinal tract time to adjust if you don't normally eat a lot of fiber.

3 things to know before you go

Donna Kelce, wearing her son Travis' No. 87 jersey, and Taylor Swift are seen during the Kansas City Chiefs' game with the Chicago Bears in Kansas City, Missouri. Sales of Kelce's jersey soared after Swift appeared at the game.
Jason Hanna / Getty Images
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Getty Images
Donna Kelce, wearing her son Travis' No. 87 jersey, and Taylor Swift are seen during the Kansas City Chiefs' game with the Chicago Bears in Kansas City, Missouri. Sales of Kelce's jersey soared after Swift appeared at the game.

  1. Kansas City Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce saw sales of his jersey spike nearly 400% after Taylor Swift attended a game and sat with his mom on Sunday.
  2. Biden's dog Commander has bitten another Secret Service officer. The German shepherd is known to have bitten several agents 10 times in total from October 2022 to January 2023. 
  3. An 85-year-old woman is suing McDonald's. She alleges workers were negligent in securing her coffee cup lid, which caused coffee to spill and burn her stomach, groin and leg area. The incident is renewing interest in a similar 1994 lawsuit.

This newsletter was edited by Majd Al-Waheidi. Rachel Treisman contributed.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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