Rock River

Rock River Ride Day 5: The Mighty Mississippi

Jun 15, 2018

I woke up in P-town and found radio’s Carl Nelson in my tent. Apparently his new hammock had not been up to snuff and he was unable to get into a horizontal position. He had earlier told me things would work out and I should not worry, and he was right. He had found a tent to sleep in after all.

Rock River Ride Day 4: Oregon To Prophetstown

Jun 14, 2018
Carl Nelson

A strange night for me last night: camped at home with my own warm shower (I’d give me a positive review), but also still on the ride with Carl, who slept in our basement and ate fresh eggs from our chickens and tortillas from a grocery store.

Rock River Ride Day 3: Rockford

Jun 13, 2018
Carl Nelson

The day started in high style: woke up from a relaxing sleep in my tent to find Carl Nelson already up and walking around the Finks' lawn. We listened with much delight to that day's Rock River Ride, which aired that morning on WNIJ.

Soon our group assembled for breakfast: Professor Fink and his wife and young daughter, Carl and me, and this morning we were joined by bicyclist and Rock River frequenter and enjoyer, Dom Cozzi. We biked into Beloit, the six of us, on a bracing and hilly route into Beloit, which Carl and I found somewhat challenging before breakfast.

Rock River Ride Day 2: Watertown to Beloit

Jun 12, 2018
Carl Nelson / WNIJ

We started the day in Watertown, where Carl Nelson and I were pleased to discover the weather had improved considerably.  Instead of cold, it was pleasant and, instead of rain, it was no rain. We had breakfast at a cafe and were met by Chris Fink, Professor of Literature and Wisconsin Awesomeness at Beloit College.

 Carl Nelson and I have spent our first day riding the Rock River Trail. We started in Theresa, Wisconsin— which is not locally pronounced “Ter-ree-sah,” like the saint, but “the Riza,” like the Wu-Tang Clan fellow. Though it was raining hard, Carl and I headed out in good spirits. 

We met up with Greg Farnham, who coordinated the Rock River Initiative, and George Marsh, the president of the Village of Theresa. They gave us good advice about the ride, and Greg even chaperoned us several miles in his car.

Fishing in northern Illinois waterways can provide a great deal of sport, but it may also provide reason for concern.

While there are nutritional benefits of eating fish from Illinois lakes and rivers, contaminants can make fish less than ideal to eat.

The Illinois Department of Public Health issues a fish advisory for more than 90 waterways in the state. The “eatability” of fish from those waters is rated based on the size and species of fish commonly caught there.

The food safety of fish also varies according to where you fish in what body of water.

If you’ve been worried about foam and a red cast in some of the branches of the Kishwaukee and Rock Rivers,you can relax.

It is not, according to the Illinois EPA, due to some unreported industrial or agricultural release. The EPA says investigations have determined that these are rare but natural occurrences. In this case, weather and water conditions in northwestern Illinois have been just right to promote growth of a particular type of algae.

Grand Detour celebrates history in cemetery

Jun 11, 2012
WNIJ

hGrand Detour, Illinois is located near the Rock River, northeast of Dixon. It is the site where John Deere invented the first successful steel plow. It was also home to Myron Strong, a direct descendent of Mayflower passenger Miles Standish.

For three of the past four years, the St. Peter's Church Preservation Committee of Grand Detour has sponsored a historical walk through the village's cemetery called "Tales from the Tombs."  The event features volunteers who portray the village's notable residents from the past.

This year, the walk was held Sunday June 10th.