Quincy

quincyivh.org

Gov. Bruce Rauner signed a law Tuesday to speed up reconstruction of the troubled state-run veterans' home in Quincy.

The Republican governor approved the legislation to consolidate the design and building processes under state law to save time in overhauling the western Illinois campus where 13 people have died since 2015 because of Legionnaires' disease, although groundbreaking is a year away.

"It's an important step forward to serve our veterans, to keep our veterans safe and healthy," Rauner said.

Jason Parrott / Tri States Public Radio

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner used a trip to Quincy Tuesday afternoon to thank the Illinois General Assembly for passing a balanced budget that includes $53 million for the Illinois Veterans Home.

“Today is a very good day for our heroes here at the Quincy Veterans Home,” said Rauner. “It’s a very good day for our wonderful staff… this is an extended family here in this wonderful home, and it’s a great day for Adams County and all of Illinois.”

quincyivh.org

Governor Bruce Rauner’s administration says a costly rebuild of the Illinois Veterans' Home in Quincy is the best way to get rid of Legionella bacteria linked to more than a dozen deaths there. While some state legislators support the move, others remain skeptical.

quincyivh.org

A makeover of the Illinois Veterans Home at Quincy costing as much as $278 million is the best option for eradicating Legionnaires' disease there, a preliminary report says.

quincyivh.org

Governor Bruce Rauner unveiled a plan for dealing with future outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease at the Illinois Veterans' Home in Quincy  during a stop at the home Thursday afternoon.

Rauner said temporarily relocating the roughly 350 residents would be risky, given their ages and health conditions. But he said if that is needed, some could be moved to the shuttered Sycamore Health Care building.

The state is trying to acquire and upgrade the former nursing home, which is several blocks from the Illinois Veterans' Home.

ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' AFFAIRS

Illinois is using emergency spending rules to upgrade the water system at the veterans’ home in Quincy. Outbreaks of the waterborne Legionnaires’ Disease have killed and sickened dozens of residents and staff.

Calling the current water system a “danger to public health,” the Department of Veterans' Affairs is buying $650,000 worth of new water filters, faucets, and bacteria monitoring equipment.

By declaring the purchases “emergencies,” the state is bypassing normal spending safeguards, which can add months of public scrutiny.

Victoria Lunacek / WNIJ

Gov. Bruce Rauner's administration reversed course Monday and announced that it will replace residence halls at the Quincy veterans' facility, which housed victims of a Legionnaires' disease outbreak responsible for the deaths 13 people and making dozens more ill since 2015.

 

NPR Illinois

Illinois officials have confirmed a fourth case of Legionnaires' disease at the Quincy veterans home in a week.

The Departments of Public Health and Veterans' Affairs announced late Tuesday that a resident has been diagnosed with the pneumonia-like malady.

It's the fourth case announced by state officials since Feb. 13. The illness caused by Legionella bacteria inhaled from water vapor first appeared in 2015 and has returned each year since.

Chase Cavanaugh/WNIJ

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner discussed several state issues at a news conference in Rockford Friday.

The event began as a private roundtable with small business owners at the Field Fastener company. They aired various grievances regarding state policy and how it affects their companies.  Field Fastener President Jim Derry said many of his current customers are outside the area or the state, compared with when he began the business 27 years ago, and said reforms are needed.

quincyivh.org

The water system at a state-run veterans’ home in Quincy where 13 people have died of Legionnaires’ disease may never be fully cleansed of the bacteria that causes the sometimes fatal illness, and more cases could be inevitable, federal public health authorities warned Thursday.

This arch acknowledges the original name of the Illinois Veterans Home in Quincy. The name was changed in 1974.Credit Andrew Gill/WBEZEdit | Remove

durbin.senate.gov

Illinois U.S. Senator Dick Durbin is again criticizing Governor Bruce Rauner’s handling of Legionnaires’ disease at a veterans home, saying “We need solutions, not cover-ups.”

 Durbin’s statement comes after WBEZ published a 2015 email from Nirav Shah - the state’s public health director. In it he writes agency officials waited six days after they knew an epidemic was on their hands at the Quincy veterans’ home before publicizing it.

Cabinet Secretary Visits Quincy To Discuss Opioid Epidemic

Aug 4, 2017
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price visited Quincy Thursday morning to hear how local organizations are dealing with the rise in opioid-related deaths nationwide.

He spoke in a private round table with representatives of local law enforcement, emergency responders, and health-care providers. Price said the opioid crisis is one of the top three priorities for his agency.

Feds Reimburse $4M For Quincy Veterans Home Water System

Feb 1, 2017
CDC

The federal government is reimbursing Illinois more than $4 million for a new water treatment facility at a Quincy veterans home that was the site of a Legionnaires Disease outbreak.

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner said Wednesday that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs was awarding the money to the Illinois Department of Veterans' Affairs, which would reimburse the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency.

An outbreak of the disease killed 12 people and sickened at least 54 in 2015 and a federal report found the bacteria was likely spread by an aging water system.