Illinois Federation of Teachers

NPR Illinois

Long before he ran for governor, Bruce Rauner was a champion for school choice. That’s the shorthand way of saying he used his considerable clout and cash to support charter schools, most of which don’t welcome teacher unions.

Flickr user / alamosbasement "old school" (CC BY 2.0)

The Illinois General Assembly has sent a bill to Gov. Bruce Rauner that would raise the minimum starting salary for public-school teachers.

Senate Bill 2892 would raise the minimum starting salary for a public school teacher in Illinois to $40,000. It does this through a sliding scale, gradually increasing the minimum until it reaches the target by 2022.

Flickr user Brent Hoard "ECU School of Education Class Room" (CC BY 2.0)

President Donald Trump’s proposal to arm teachers as a school safety precaution doesn’t sit well with Illinois teachers.

Illinois Federation of Teachers president Dan Montgomery says he has yet to talk to an educator who thinks it’s a good idea. He says this could affect the teacher shortage.

“People are not going to want to go into the profession if the job description includes being a paramilitary officer who may well have to shoot children,” he says.

  The Illinois Valley Federation of Support Staff Local 6561, a bargaining unit with the Illinois Federation of Teachers,  filed a complaint with the state’s Educational Labor Relations Board. 

The Ottawa Times says the College owes scheduled 2% raises to support staff, but these weren’t paid as of July 1st 2015.   

Trustees didn’t provide a response during last night’s board meeting, but the two parties met behind closed doors afterward. 

Ultimately, they released a joint statement saying they need clarification from people who weren’t there Thursday.

afscme.org

Union leaders say Governor Bruce Rauner's move to end negotiations with Illinois' largest state employees union is frustrating and capricious. 

Rauner announced Friday that he was seeking an impasse in talks with AFSCME after roughly a year of talks.

Public school teachers aren't directly affected.

But Dan Montgomery -- who heads the Illinois Federation of Teachers -- says some of its members do work for the state.

Mongtomery says it was a knock to labor, especially given that it happened heading into Martin Luther King weekend.