Donald Trump

www.ussteel.com

President Donald Trump will be visiting an Illinois steel mill that is boosting production as he faces opposition to his use of tariffs in international trade disputes.

 

The White House says Trump will talk about trade during an event Thursday afternoon at the U.S. Steel Corp. plant in Granite City, Illinois. This is his first trip to Illinois since becoming president.

The company started in March, restarting two blast furnaces at the Granite City Works that were shut down in 2015, costing 2,000 jobs. U.S. Steel has announced the recalls of about 800 workers.

https://www.supremecourt.gov

One of the major stories to come out of Washington D.C. this week was President Trump’s nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. On this week’s Friday Forum, WNIJ’s Jenna Dooley talks with Mitch Pickerill, a political scientist at Northern Illinois University.

Pickerill says the choice of the conservative Kavanaugh to replace Anthony Kennedy makes sense politically.

Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Illinois U.S. Sen, Dick Durbin says Rod Blagojevich should have gotten a shorter prison sentence.

Ever since last week, when President Trump said he was thinking about commuting the former governor’s sentence, many Illinois politicians have refused to talk about it.

That’s what current Gov. Bruce Rauner did Monday.

But Durbin was unequivocal.

Ahn Young-joon/AP

President Trump has called off a highly anticipated June 12 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

"Sadly, based on the tremendous anger and open hostility displayed in your most recent statement, I feel it is inappropriate, at this time, to have this long planned meeting," Trump wrote in a letter to Kim.

Trump's decision comes hours after North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui, in remarks carried on the country's official KCNA news service, said it would not "beg the U.S. for dialogue" and warned that it could make Washington "taste an appalling tragedy."

Chase Cavanaugh / WNIJ News

Governor Bruce Rauner says he would send Illinois National Guard soldiers to the US-Mexico border, if asked by President Donald Trump.

“Frankly, the president is the commander-in-chief of our military," he said while fielding questions at an event in Springfield Tuesday. "Illinois has not been requested to send troops. If we are requested, I believe we’ll honor that request.”

  

So far, only Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico have agreed to send guardsmen, after President Trump called for a military response to what he calls “lawlessness” at the border.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Former Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton criticized Donald Trump yesterday in Chicago over proposed cuts to public library funding. 

She spoke at the annual conference of the American Library Association, recounting how she obtained her first library card in Park Ridge. Clinton said libraries continue to play a role in rural and poor communities and pushed against President Trump's proposal to eliminate $230,000 in federal funding. 

Live Asian Carp Discovered Near Lake Michigan

Jun 26, 2017
Illinois Department of Natural Resources

Fears that Asian carp could show up in the Great Lakes were renewed when one of the fish was caught on June 22 near the T.J. O’Brien Lock and Dam in the Little Calumet River, just nine miles from Lake Michigan.

U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger has called for an independent investigation of Russia's connection to President Donald Trump's political campaign.  

A Better President Starts With You

Mar 23, 2017

We moved to Rockford in the summer of 2008; I was hired at Rockford University the same time as our then new president, Robert Head. Shortly thereafter, Barack Obama was elected president. My two boys, both black, had the incredibly unique experience of growing up in a world where both the president of their dad’s University and the president of the United States looked “like them.”

President Trump, who spent the weekend at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, held another round of interviews for the position of national security adviser.

Trump interviewed four finalists on Sunday: acting adviser Keith Kellogg, who is a retired three-star Army general; former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton; Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, an Army strategist; and Lt. Gen. Robert Caslen Jr., superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

abrahamlincolnonline.org

A protest against President Donald Trump’s immigration order drew families from Springfield’s Muslim community.

It happened Monday at the Old State Capitol historic site.

11-year-old Aliya Hashmi says it’s her first ever protest; she thinks the president’s order targets people who have done nothing wrong.

“I don’t think it’s right, and it’s not really fair to innocent people who haven’t done anything against the Constitution, and Trump’s making a big deal about nothing, so,” Hashmi said.

Susan Stephens

The President’s recent executive order put in place a 90-day ban on entry visas for immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim nations (Syria, Iran, Iraq, Somalia, Libya, Sudan and Yemen).  And it’s worrying the international community at NIU.

The concern is particularly strong among those present on a student visa.  Stephanie Brown, Associate Director of the International Student and Faculty Office, says only a small number of NIU's roughly 1,100 international students are affected directly. 

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

President Trump has fired Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, concluding she has "betrayed the Department of Justice" by refusing to defend his executive order that imposes a temporary ban on refugees and visa holders from seven majority-Muslim countries.

In a statement, the White House called Yates, an Obama administration holdover with 27 years of experience prosecuting corrupt public officials and the man who bombed the Atlanta Olympic park, "weak on borders and very weak on illegal immigration."

U.S. Capitol
"United States Capitol" by Flickr User Cliff / (CC X 2.0)

GOP leaders in the House and Senate say torturing suspected terrorists is illegal, and that stand distances them from President Donald Trump's endorsement of the effectiveness of harsh interrogation techniques.

The U.S. has a legal ban on torture.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky tells reporters that virtually all GOP senators ``are comfortable with the state of the law on that issue.''

And House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin says: ``Torture's not legal. And we agree with it not being legal.''

Wikipedia

Donald Trump made a tweet Tuesday night singling out Chicago crime.  

The President said that if Chicago doesn't "fix the horrible 'carnage' going on" he would "send in the feds."  He further claims that Chicago had 228 shootings in 2017 so far.  Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson responded late Tuesday, saying he's more than willing to form partnerships with the Justice department, Justice, FBI, DEA, and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. 

Illinois Treasurer Mike Frerichs wants the Trump administration to help protect the state’s medical marijuana industry.

Federal law currently forbids banks from processing money used for cannabis transactions.  This makes it difficult for these businesses to get loans and pushes customers to pay only with cash. 

The Obama administration said prosecuting banks for these violations wasn't a priority, and Frerichs wants the same assurances from Trump.  

Michelle Kittling-Brewer

Emily Eckles, Dixon, Ill.

"What I want the new president to know about my community is that it is very diverse in race, gender, and sexuality. The United States is home to many different cultures and customs, and not any single group should be singled out for any reason."

U.S. Capitol
"United States Capitol" by Flickr User Cliff / (CC X 2.0)

For elected officials in Illinois, attending Donald Trump's inauguration Friday is a political event. And their presence or absence is a political statement.

Several congressmen who represent parts of Chicago are skipping the Inauguration, but their reasons vary.

U.S. Rep. Luis Gutierrez gave a whole list of reasons in a speech on the House floor for boycotting -- from Trump’s comments on sexually assaulting women to blaming the outcome of a court case on the Mexican heritage of a federal judge.

John Cabello

A Rockford-area state representative who co-chaired Donald Trump's campaign in Illinois is going to Washington to see his candidate sworn in as president.

John Cabello, R-Machesney Park, says Trump's message of bringing back jobs resonated with him and, apparently, many others.

Cabello is the only Hispanic Republican in the legislature. He says that, when it comes to issues like a wall on the Mexican border and deportation of those who have immigrated here illegally,  he realizes he's at odds with some others in the Hispanic community.

A lot of women were hoping to see a female president sworn in this week. Instead, hundreds of thousands are headed to Washington to protest and raise awareness of human rights and social justice issues important to them.

Keri Tate of Springfield is among those who will be going by bus to the Women's March, set for Saturday. And she'll have a message for Donald Trump and Republicans controlling congress. 

durbin.senate.gov

There aren’t many areas where Democrat Dick Durbin thinks he’ll agree with Donald Trump. But rebuilding the nation’s infrastructure is one of them:

“If he wishes to move forward on infrastructure, for example, I hope we can find a way to do it. We desperately need it as a nation. He said as much. I hope he can convince Republicans in Congress as well.”

The senior Illinois U.S. Senator says he has serious doubts about many of Trump’s picks for cabinet secretaries, including Rick Perry for the Department of Energy and Betsy DeVos for the Department of Education.

twitter.com/BruceRauner

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner won’t attend President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration.  

Rauner says he’s “focused on Illinois” and is trying “to minimize the distractions” and his time out of state. The governor says he has friends in Trump's upcoming administration and expects Illinois to have a good relationship with the president-elect.  

Trump will take the oath of office Jan. 20, just 5 days before Rauner is scheduled to give the State of the State speech in Springfield.

The Illinois Hospital Association says there could be significant fiscal and human consequences if Obamacare is repealed and there's no replacement plan.  

President-elect Donald Trump and Congressional Republicans made repealing the Affordable Care Act a key plank in their campaigns. IHA President A.J. Wilhelmi says that could be an expensive proposition.  

"Hospitals faced with cuts have tough decisions to make, and those decisions include laying off staff, reducing services, and putting projects on hold for infrastructure improvement."

Durbin.senate.gov

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin says his Democratic colleagues will pose tough questions to President-elect Donald Trump’s appointees. 

Durbin will vote on nominees such as Sen. Jeff Sessions for U.S. Attorney General. Durbin has worked closely with Sessions in the past but also differed with the Alabama Republican on certain issues.  He wants Sessions to lay out his views on immigration and criminal justice reform.

BRIAN MACKEY / NPR ILLINOIS

Any companies that may end up helping build a wall on the U.S./Mexico border would stand to lose Illinois investments, under a proposal unveiled Tuesday.

The legislation would forbid the state's pension funds from investing in any firm that participates in the wall proposed by President-Elect Donald Trump.

State Representative Lisa Hernandez, a Chicago Democrat, says the plan sends a message that Illinois supports immigrants, not divisiveness.

http://kinzinger.house.gov/

Northern Illinois Congressman Adam Kinzinger declined to elaborate on his presidential vote.   

The Republican visited Illinois Valley Community College yesterday to host his fourth-annual Youth Leadership Summit. The Ottawa Times reports he didn’t vote for Clinton or Trump, but declined to mention his specific choice, citing the secret ballot. 

duckworth.house.gov

She may be a Democrat, but the new U.S. Senator from Illinois says she's prepared to work with President-Elect Donald Trump to reunite and heal the nation.

U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth is a veteran; she lost her legs 12 years ago while flying a helicopter in the Iraq War.

Trump will be the first President who hasn't served in government or the military.           

Illinois US Senator Mark Kirk says he knows how the Republican Party can be successful after this year’s presidential campaign that’s divided the party.

  

Kirk has called on his party’s nominee, Donald Trump, to drop out of the race.

Appearing on WBEZ’s Morning Shift, Kirk was asked about the future of the GOP after this election.

Kirk says Republicans should talk about financial issues, and he compared Illinois’ state government to Puerto Rico and Greece, which have also been struggling financially.

Republican U.S. Senator Mark Kirk and his Democratic challenger, U.S. Representative Tammy Duckworth, spoke out against Donald Trump after he made statements suggesting the presidential election was rigged, and that he might not accept the results.  

Mitt Romney Stumps For Sen. Mark Kirk In Chicago

Oct 20, 2016

Mitt Romney stumped for US Senator Mark Kirk in Chicago.   

The former presidential nominee says a Republican Senate could keep the president in check.

"It’s essential that we have a Republican Senate to keep the Senate and keep America from going off the rails," he said.

Both Romney and incumbent Senator Kirk say they won’t vote for Donald Trump.

Kirk says he and Romney share another similarity: both are Republicans who have won in states that tend to favor Democrats.

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