abortion

Daisy Contreras / NPR Illinois

Illinois gubernatorial candidates will soon receive a written pledge in the mail asking them to support the new law expanding abortion coverage — and oppose any push to repeal it.

After Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner signed a law providing abortion coverage under state health insurance and Medicaid, some — like state Rep. Jeanne Ives who ran against him on the GOP ticket in the primary — said it showed Rauner’s position on the issue is too liberal. According to Ives, the governor's decision encouraged her to run as his opponent. 

Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Commentary: Insights from the 2018 primary election

"Is this embattled Republican governor toast?" -- Natasha Korecki, Politico

"Is Gov. Bruce Rauner a lame duck limping?" -- Chuck Sweeny, Rockford Register Star

Alisa Ryan/Flickr

Anti-abortion advocates made their initial appearance in a Springfield courtroom yesterday.

They’re challenging a new Illinois law that will allow state money to pay for some abortions. It applies to women who have health insurance through state employment, as well as those on the Medicaid program. Lawyer Peter Breen says their case is about how state tax money is spent — not whether abortion is right or wrong.

Daisy Contreras/NPR Illinois

A measure that would allow taxpayer funding for abortions was sent to Gov. Bruce Rauner's desk today, and supporters want him to declare his support publicly before taking any further steps. 

In Rockford to visit a charter school Monday, Rauner again declined to reveal his specific position on the bill.

“There are passionate voices,” he said, “and I respect, frankly, both sides of the arguments. I am personally pro-choice, but I respect the moral arguments and the debate on the other side, and I am listening and we will make a decision in the near future."

A federal judge has ruled an Illinois law requiring hospital and medical clinic professionals to tell pregnant women about all their available options, including abortion, can't be enforced.

The Chicago Tribune reports U.S. District Court Judge Frederick Kapala  says that, until litigation is settled, the law shouldn't be enforced.

The Thomas More Society filed a lawsuit in March, targeting a provision added to the Health Care Right of Conscience Act last year that requires physicians to discuss all medical options available to patients.

Jenna Dooley / WNIJ

A controversial measure approved Wednesday in the Illinois Senate would expand government funding of abortion to include state employees and lower-income women on government health plans.

It also would repeal a so-called “trigger” in state law which Democrats argue could automatically outlaw abortion should the 1973 Roe v. Wade U.S. Supreme Court decision ever be overturned.

Many Republicans found the expanded funding particularly objectionable.

"Money" By Flickr User Pictures of Money / (CC BY 2.0)

A Democratic lawmaker pushing legislation to remove prohibitions on publicly funded abortions in Illinois hopes to call it for a vote as thousands of women converge on the capital to lobby for a "progressive agenda."

Chicago Rep. Sara Feigenholtz's measure would lift restrictions on abortions funded by Medicaid or state employee health insurance.

She says the legislation also is important because it ensures abortion remains on the books in Illinois if the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court ruling legalizing abortion is overturned.

Phil Masterton / WNIJ

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner says he no longer supports expanding abortion coverage for state workers and Medicaid recipients because it's too controversial, and Illinois needs to focus on other issues such as creating jobs.

Phil Masterton / WNIJ

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner is opposing legislation that would allow the state to cover abortions for its employees and Medicaid recipients.

  

Eleni Demertzis is Rauner's spokeswoman. She said Friday the governor is committed to protecting women's rights under current law but recognizes the ``sharp divisions of opinion'' on taxpayer-funded abortion coverage.

Jenna Dooley / WNIJ

New legislation would make the most dramatic changes since the 1970s to Illinois law dealing with abortion.

The prime target is a statute enacted after the U.S. Supreme Court’s Roe v Wade decision, which legalized abortion nationwide. State Rep. Sara Feigenholtz (D-Chicago) calls it the "trigger" law.

She says the administration of President Donald Trump is responsible for an awakening in women’s rights.

Wikimedia

Eighteen Illinois women's health organizations have sued Gov. Bruce Rauner over a law requiring pregnancy centers to tell patients about the benefits of abortion despite conscience-based objections.

Thomas Olp is an attorney for the Thomas More Society, which filed the lawsuit Thursday in Sangamon County.

The measure requiring dispensing of abortion information changed a 1977 law allowing health care professionals to refuse to provide services they consider morally objectionable.

CREDIT "COURTROOM ONE GAVEL" BY FLICKR USER BETH CORTEZ-NEAVEL / (CC BY 2.0)

A northern Illinois judge has granted an injunction to health care providers who are suing the state over a law that requires them to provide information or referrals to patients seeking abortions.

Winnebago County Judge Eugene Doherty granted the injunction Tuesday. He says the providers who object to abortion "raised a fair question" about whether the law violates "their right to be free from government compelled speech."

The group filed the lawsuit against the state in August after a state law was amended in July to include the new requirements.

"Electronic Stethescope" By Flickr User Ted Eytan / (CC BY 2.0)

Health-care providers in northern Illinois who object to abortion are asking for a preliminary injunction against a state law that requires them to provide information or referrals to patients seeking the procedure.

a women’s health non-profit, a Rockford medical center and a Downers Grove physician filed a lawsuit against Gov. Bruce Rauner and other state officials in August after the law was amended in July.

Carl Nelson / WNIJ

Several northern Illinois crisis pregnancy centers are suing the governor over an amendment to the Health Care Right of Conscience Act.

The provision requires health care providers disseminate information about abortion to women that ask about the procedure, even if they have a "conscience-based objection.”  

A Rockford pregnancy center and Downers Grove doctor are suing to overturn the newly updated Illinois right-of-conscience law.

Right-of-conscience laws come into play when medical providers' obligations to provide treatment conflict with their personal beliefs.

The governor just signed a law updating the Illinois statute.

No doctor is required to perform an abortion, but a physician -- even one with moral or faith-based opposition to the practice -- now is required to refer a patient to a medical professional who will provide the procedure.

A licensed practical nurse is suing the Winnebago County Health Department over allegedly violating her religious conscience.

Vijay Kumar Koulampet, CC BY-SA 3.0 / via Wikimedia Commons

Wisconsin may ban research on aborted fetal tissue. A bill moving through the legislature would outlaw selling, donating, and experimenting with fetal body parts in Wisconsin. Republican lawmakers behind the measure say it wouldn’t affect current research using existing cell lines.

  The Wisconsin Assembly’s criminal justice committee held a hearing Tuesday: supporters say they hope to have the votes lined up to pass the ban as early as next month.

Vijay Kumar Koulampet, CC BY-SA 3.0 / via Wikimedia Commons

The Wisconsin State Assembly has passed a bill banning non-emergency abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. 

The Republican-controlled chamber approved the bill 61-34 Thursday. The Senate passed the measure in June. It now goes to Governor Scott Walker, who has said he will sign it into law. 

Under the proposal, doctors who perform a non-emergency abortion after 20 weeks could be punished by up to $10,000 in fines and 3 1/2 years in prison. The bill doesn't provide exceptions for pregnancies resulting from sexual assault or incest.  

Young women in Illinois will need to notify their parents before getting an abortion. The state’s parental notification law was upheld today by the Illinois Supreme Court.