Democrat Kyrsten Sinema Wins Arizona Senate Race, Flipping Second GOP Seat

Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET Democrat Kyrsten Sinema has defeated Republican Martha McSally to win the Arizona Senate race, the Associated Press projected Monday evening. With Sinema's victory to flip the open seat of retiring GOP Sen. Jeff Flake, she becomes the first Democrat Arizona has elected to the Senate since 1988. She will not only be the state's first female senator but will also be the first openly bisexual senator in U.S. history. Shortly after the race was called in her favor, Sinema...

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Carpentersville, IL – This academic year, the Carpentersville school district has a tight budget, smaller staff and fewer programs because a referendum failed last spring. A student films the effects of the change, and gets local reaction for a documentary he's producing.

DeKalb – DeKalb author Amy Timberlake sat down with WNIJ's Chris Lehman to discuss her first children's book, "The Dirty Cowboy". The book is set in the desert southwest, and is based on a story that has been passed down through her family for several generations.

Creston, IL – Some newspapers are proud of their longevity. But as WNIJ's Chris Lehman reports, one local paper is so new, it's catching the people it covers somewhat off guard.

DeKalb, IL – During bad economic times college enrollment usually goes up. This fall, figures at Northern Illinois University showed this trend. The university saw a surge in minority enrollment, particularly among Latinos. But there's a strong chance the Latino students will not complete their degrees. Some school officials are working to stop this phenomenon.

St. Louis, MO – Over the next year, some vampires, werewolves and wraiths will be wiped out of the "world of darkness" as a long-running live action role-playing game comes to an end. Players from around the world have to decide whether they will let their characters die off or they will hang on until the very end.

Genoa, IL – Illinois Air National Guard pilot Brian Slavenas was killed when his helicopter was shot down in Iraq. He was buried in Genoa, Illinois: Slavenas' family held two memorial services for him, each one representing their opposing views of the war. WNIJ's Susan Stephens reports:

State of Illinois photo

DeKalb, IL – State Representative David Wirsing will be laid to rest this Friday. The Sycamore Republican died Sunday at his home after suffering an apparent heart attack. WNIJ's Chris Lehman reports.

Channahon, IL – Suburban farm families face more pressures than bad weather and poor commodity prices. The Bleuer family of Channahon talks about farmland being sold out from under them, a lack of understanding from new neighbors, and intergenerational issues.

DeKalb, IL – People are drawn to the fresh air and open spaces of country living. But they're often surprised by the smells and slow-moving traffic that come with the territory. Also, urban lawmakers often find themselves making decisions about agriculture without understanding farming issues.

Orangeville, IL – Farming in DuPage and Kendall counties had become so difficult for Kent Smith that he decided to sell the family farm. Now he's happy with his new farm in rural northwest Illinois, near the Wisconsin border.

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Amazon's HQ2 is getting divided by two.

Instead of building a massive second headquarters in one location, Amazon is expected to announce as early as Tuesday, that it would build two offices, one in New York City and another in Northern Virginia near Washington, D.C., according to a person familiar with the plan. The specific locations are expected to be the Long Island City neighborhood in Queens and the Crystal City area in Arlington, Va.

The world is about to say au revoir to Le Grand K, a cylinder of platinum and iridium that has long reigned over the world's system of weight measurement.

Le Grand K was forged in 1879 and is held in a locked vault outside Paris — revered and kept under lock and key because its mass, a little over two pounds, is the official definition of the kilogram.

By the time Chinese guards began torturing Kayrat Samarkand inside a re-education camp last spring, he says his life had prepared him for this.

The ethnic Kazakh grew up in the mountains of rural Xinjiang, just miles away from China's border with Kazakhstan. When he was 11 years old, his parents died. A man from his village lured the young orphan to a nearby city with the promise of work, and then sold him to a criminal gang of ethnic Uighurs, the predominant ethnic minority in Xinjiang, who managed a network of child thieves throughout China.

No one ever shows up at brunch and says, "Oh my gosh, I was so sober last night!"

Risky behavior draws attention. As a result, people tend to assume that everyone else is doing it more than they really are.

But, over the last two decades, research on college campuses has shown that giving students the real facts about their peers reduces unsafe drinking. This approach is called positive social norms. It works because of a basic truth of human nature: People want to do what others are doing.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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